New blog: Infinity Plus One

Jan 2017
1
0
California
So, I've started a new blog, Infinity Plus One, discussing more advanced math topics, but aimed at a lay audience. I thought this forum looked like a place where people interested in this kind of resource (or who know those who would be) congregate. So, here are links for my first two posts. I hope you enjoy them.

First post: Infinity plus one

Second post: The size of infinity
 

topsquark

Math Team
May 2013
2,449
1,015
The Astral plane
So, I've started a new blog, Infinity Plus One, discussing more advanced math topics, but aimed at a lay audience. I thought this forum looked like a place where people interested in this kind of resource (or who know those who would be) congregate. So, here are links for my first two posts. I hope you enjoy them.

First post: Infinity plus one

Second post: The size of infinity
Nice work overall. But stop referring to infinity as a number. It is not in any way shape or form a number.

-Dan
 

SDK

Sep 2016
739
496
USA
Nice work overall. But stop referring to infinity as a number. It is not in any way shape or form a number.

-Dan
I think we tell calculus students this because they aren't yet equipped with methods to handle the number infinity. However, I disagree that infinity is not a number in any way. There are multiple contexts in which infinity is a perfectly good number and a blog discussing advanced math topics is likely to cover these.
 

topsquark

Math Team
May 2013
2,449
1,015
The Astral plane
I think we tell calculus students this because they aren't yet equipped with methods to handle the number infinity. However, I disagree that infinity is not a number in any way. There are multiple contexts in which infinity is a perfectly good number and a blog discussing advanced math topics is likely to cover these.
You can label the cardinal number \(\displaystyle \aleph _0\) but you can't change the fact that you can't count to it.

I did make a slight mistake, however. I forget the name of the system but it is the real numbers with infinity attached, rather like the closure of the real line. I think it's called the extended real line or something of that nature.

-Dan
 

v8archie

Math Team
Dec 2013
7,709
2,677
Colombia
The extended real line doesn't include a number "infinity". It's more like a set of names for limit points.
 
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