I've had a go at trying to find a pattern to prime numbers

Mar 2015
204
5
England
Prime Remainder * Fraction +1 = Prime Fraction * Ordinal = Prime
-------1-----------------1------------------2---------------1--------2
-------1----------------0.5----------------1.5--------------2--------3
-------2----------------0.3----------------1.6--------------3--------5
And so on.

The most exciting part for me was when I tried to find the Prime fractions pattern, it led me on to using Continued fractions and it worked for the first three.

(1+1) = 2
(1+1/(1+1)) = 1.5
(1+1/(1+1/(1+1))) = 1.6

And then it stopped :(

I just had to share this.
 
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Jan 2014
392
71
The backwoods of Northern Ontario
Doing it on my calculator, I found your third line does not equal 1.6, but 1.666... (which when multiple by 3, results in 5)
I tried doing a fourth line, and that one worked out to 1.6
 
Mar 2015
204
5
England
1+1-1/2+1/9-(1/15+(1/10+1/20)) + (1/4+1/5)-1/30

I saw that pi divided by four is equal to one minus one third plus one fifth minus one seventh and so on.

So I tried something similar to find prime fraction pattern, unfortunately I don't think the above is really a pattern at all.

EDIT: I just used a calculator and realized the above is wrong, I messed up on + 1/9 it makes 1.61... not 1.6...

I do feel that finding prime fractions is the way forward to finding primes.

1+1-1/2+1/9+1/45-(1/15+(1/10+1/20)) + (1/4+1/5)-1/30
 
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Jan 2014
392
71
The backwoods of Northern Ontario
What is a "prime fraction"?
 
Mar 2015
204
5
England
I'm taking prime fractions more seriously now,
Check this out

0--1---2---3-----4
1+1-1/2+1/6+1/12

Prime fractions are fractions that when multiplied by their ordinal makes prime.

EDIT: I'm looking at this on a spread sheet
 
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Mar 2015
204
5
England
Hello everyone, so I've been working more on prime fractions

1+1-1/2+1/6+1/12+9/20.-..1/30.+.11/42..-..3/56...+..13/72..+...31/90.-.2/110.+..35/132
--0-2----4----6------8-----10------12--------14--------16---------18--------20-------22

So I worked out that the bottom row is that the denominator gets the two times table added to it.

As for the top row, well I haven't a clue. I think if I was a Mathematics Institute this would be one of those things I would offer a Million pounds for. But what I can realistically offer you is possible satisfaction, an askii art thumbs up and a thanks on the post.

EDIT: Enumerator, up close and personal. 1,1,1,9,1,11,3,13,31,2,35

Oh and I'll quote your post in my caption on this forum for the rest of time.
 
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