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February 28th, 2018, 07:02 AM   #11
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Hi Studiot.

Yes majority of it makes sense, equilibrium part most certainly.
Covered a few basics regarding the topic but very limited as you can tell.

So....in the event of the object moving directly south, the resultant force would no longer be = 0. What would it then equal?

In order to achieve this am I right in saying I could increase the magnitude of force B and also adjust the direction of force A?

Thanks for your patience you must be pulling your hair out.
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February 28th, 2018, 07:12 AM   #12
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You started with three forces that created equilibrium. If you change those forces by adding a force with components (0, -s), where s > 0, the new resultant will be a force of s kN directed due south. You can add (0, -s) to any one of the original forces, or you could change more than one of the original forces, provided that the changes total (0, -s).
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February 28th, 2018, 07:18 AM   #13
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Thankyou!
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February 28th, 2018, 07:22 AM   #14
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Just a quick question skipjack....


If I didn't want to add another force and only work with the forces I currently have.

In which 2 ways would I be able to change the magnitude or direction of the current forces to ensure the object moves directly South?

Thanks.
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February 28th, 2018, 08:03 AM   #15
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There are three original forces: A, B and C. They have a zero sum.

You could make any changes you like to any or all of the original forces, provided that the resultant of the changes is a force with components (0, -s), where s > 0.

For example, you could change force A from having components (-800, 0) to having components (-800, -s) and leave forces B and C unchanged, or you could leave forces A and C unchanged and change force B to have components (0, -850 - s). There are infinitely many possibilities.
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