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September 9th, 2015, 07:51 PM   #61
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How do I apply math to electronics?

I still don't see how this applies to the real world? I get excited by things like those cars that would go around a track when you pressed a button. Or a helicopter that you can make fly with electronics. Maybe I'm interested in electronic toys.

I want to make circuits that have play value to me.

Last edited by duragrip; September 9th, 2015 at 08:10 PM.
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September 10th, 2015, 12:16 AM   #62
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How about an electronic dice?
The real world application for the example I gave was for measuring the alternator current from a 1600hp diesel engine, it's a toy, just bigger
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September 10th, 2015, 12:44 AM   #63
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Electronic dice sounds like a cool toy. Now we're going in the right direction. Electronic dice I don't see as worthwhile because real dice are cheap. I don't know anything about engines. However, I am enamored by motorized toys. The electronics lab is cool it's just the circuits seems to either just make noise or turn on led lights. Those are boring toys.
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September 10th, 2015, 05:16 AM   #64
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Real dice are cheap until you've lost hundreds Depends how much you use them I guess. There is also the added advantage that you could design an any-sided dice.
The real 'worth' in building an electronic dice isn't really down to the cost, it's the learning experience of designing and building a circuit and seeing it work as you intended (or not, then spending ages working out why ).

You might be interested in this:
OscilloPhone: Use your Smartphone as an Oscilloscope / Signal Generator

The current monitoring example I gave just happened to be from an alternator, but could easily be applied to measuring current in other devices. For example, you might want to control the current through a motor in a toy, to do that you need to be able to measure the current to feed the control mechanism.

It sounds like you might need some inspiration for something useful to build, here's another good site:
Hackaday | Fresh hacks every day
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September 10th, 2015, 05:58 PM   #65
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Maybe my place is in appreciating electronics, being a connoiseur. Like those who major in art history, art appreciation, ethnomusicology, and music appreciation.

There needs to be people who listen to the music, those who are spectators of the art or sporting events, and those who buy and utilize the electronics that others design and create.

We can't all be composers, artists, engineers, designers, builders, toymakers, etc. There needs to be listeners, spectators, users of the products that these people create. Actually most people need to comprise the latter group because they put out the money and put food on the table of the former (ie. the creators).

Even though I can't make things, I can still enjoy the fruits of other people's labor. I can appreciate and joyfully play with their cool, neat inventions like the little kid I am at heart.
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September 10th, 2015, 11:25 PM   #66
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I want a remote control helicopter for my 7" scale DC Universe Batman action figure to ride around in. Is this something I can build or should I buy it pre-made? I doubt I can find one in scale with my 7" Batman figure. But remote control helicopters are so expensive.
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September 11th, 2015, 01:50 AM   #67
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I'd look to at least buy the control system 'off the shelf', avionics isn't the easiest to design from scratch (there's a lot of maths involved, I still have nightmares). There may be an arduino project which does what you want. You'd also want to buy the transmitter/receiver off the shelf. Unfortunately, these parts aren't cheap either.
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September 11th, 2015, 01:51 PM   #68
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How do I apply math to electronics?

Maybe I should write the specs and requirements, pay you to design and build it, and I'll test it personally. I'll be Jobs and you'll be Wozniack.
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September 11th, 2015, 11:08 PM   #69
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Is software the wave of the future? Can I do everything with software without knowing anything about math or electronics?
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September 12th, 2015, 06:16 AM   #70
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Math Focus: Calculus
Quote:
Originally Posted by duragrip View Post
I want to use math to calculate the values and math to graph these signals and functions. I want to go old school.
So you have to learn (if you did not yet):

- Linear Algebra and Vector Calculus
- Calculus 1 & 2
- Differental Equations and Laplace Transform
- Fourier Analysis
- Physics

Then you will apply all these concepts to electrical and electronics circuits.

You can learn all this stuff (the necessary, i.e. you do not need to learn all about physics) in University.
You can also learn them by yourself, of course, but do not forgive to make exercises!

Regards.

Last edited by szz; September 12th, 2015 at 06:30 AM.
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