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November 1st, 2019, 03:02 PM   #11
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From: Lima, Peru

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Did you acquire them online? If so, have a link?
No, I'm sorry. I didn't bought them online. These are locally printed, but judging from the way these problems are and the level of difficulty I think may come from older editions of Resnick and Halliday's Physics or from Alonso and Edward Finn's University Physics.

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Also note the authors use of speed vs velocity ... if given in component form, it's velocity.
Thanks!. I wrote down this in my notes book to keep that in consideration for next problems.


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I use MS Paint alone or with one of a few graphing programs, depending on what I want to illustrate.
I'm on Windows 7 and what I use is mostly Inkscape. Not sure if you're familiar with but its free and you may want to give it a try.
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November 1st, 2019, 03:09 PM   #12
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Once upon a time my AP Physics class had just started on rotational motion. I mentioned that the equations
$\displaystyle x = x_0 + v_0 t + \dfrac{1}{2}at^2$

and
$\displaystyle \theta = \theta _0 + \omega t + \dfrac{1}{2} \alpha t^2$

are essentially the same thing and they got all upset about the Greek variables. So the next day I wrote down something like
$\displaystyle \daleth = \daleth _0 + \beth _0 t + \dfrac{1}{2} \aleph t^2$

They were very happy to get back the Greek letters...

-Dan
Its a funny think that you mentioned that particular equation as it is one of the very few where I stick with the "traditional notation" and mostly is due to its mnemotechnic value. Because $\alpha$ looks very similar to $a$ and it eases my comprehension to link it to acceleration in horizontal motion and $\omega$ for the angular speed as the curves of the omega are akin to the corners of the letter $v$.

Another exception which I often tend to do is for sines and cosines law as I can picture better in my head the opposing sides and angles when they're arranged in the order, $a$, $b$ and $c$ for $\alpha$, $\beta$ and $\gamma$.

As you may understand at this point, all of this is subjective and changes from person to person. As I mentioned I feel happy to stick with $\omega$ and $\phi$.
Thanks from topsquark
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