My Math Forum  

Go Back   My Math Forum > Science Forums > Physics

Physics Physics Forum


Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
August 27th, 2019, 02:06 PM   #1
Senior Member
 
Joined: May 2015
From: Arlington, VA

Posts: 458
Thanks: 29

Math Focus: Number theory
Exosatellites

Will we soon detect two exoplanets orbiting each other?
Loren is offline  
 
August 28th, 2019, 12:28 PM   #2
Global Moderator
 
Joined: May 2007

Posts: 6,823
Thanks: 723

maybe.
mathman is offline  
August 28th, 2019, 09:38 PM   #3
Senior Member
 
Joined: May 2015
From: Arlington, VA

Posts: 458
Thanks: 29

Math Focus: Number theory
If we can now detect several thousands of exoplanets (mostly gas giants) by over a dozen methods, it seems reasonable that we could resolve some mutually orbiting planets.
Loren is offline  
August 29th, 2019, 01:20 AM   #4
Senior Member
 
Joined: Apr 2014
From: UK

Posts: 965
Thanks: 342

We've probably detected exoplanets, it isn't definite. I don't think we'll detect more complex orbiting bodies for a while, it's going to take some breakthrough to get better data or to be able to process the existing data in some other way that yields more information. Of course, there also might not be any, or they are so rare that we're unlikely to stumble upon them.
But, I see that as no reason to stop trying, quite the opposite.
weirddave is offline  
August 29th, 2019, 01:32 AM   #5
Senior Member
 
Joined: Apr 2014
From: Glasgow

Posts: 2,161
Thanks: 734

Math Focus: Physics, mathematical modelling, numerical and computational solutions
Quote:
Originally Posted by Loren View Post
If we can now detect several thousands of exoplanets (mostly gas giants) by over a dozen methods, it seems reasonable that we could resolve some mutually orbiting planets.
"seems reasonable" .... sure, but it's very, very difficult!

In principle, you'd have to get some very accurate, relatively noise-free photometric data from stars with exoplanets and perform repeated observations as the expolanet (and its satellite) transits across the limb of the star. Then, the rate of change of brightness with time can be studied and matched with exoplanet models.

The quality of data must be extremely high to perform such studies reliably.

There are other methods proposed as well, but I don't know anything about those.

Last edited by Benit13; August 29th, 2019 at 02:05 AM.
Benit13 is offline  
August 29th, 2019, 09:38 AM   #6
Senior Member
 
Joined: May 2015
From: Arlington, VA

Posts: 458
Thanks: 29

Math Focus: Number theory
Quote:
Originally Posted by Benit13 View Post
There are other methods proposed as well, but I don't know anything about those.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Method...ing_exoplanets
Loren is offline  
August 29th, 2019, 05:29 PM   #7
Global Moderator
 
Joined: Dec 2006

Posts: 20,975
Thanks: 2228

How large would binary exoplanets need to be, and how would "orbiting each other" be defined?
skipjack is online now  
August 30th, 2019, 08:36 AM   #8
Senior Member
 
Joined: May 2015
From: Arlington, VA

Posts: 458
Thanks: 29

Math Focus: Number theory
Quote:
Originally Posted by skipjack View Post
How large would binary exoplanets need to be, and how would "orbiting each other" be defined?
At the current pace, I guess five to ten years for the Kepler to view binary planets by one of the established detection methods listed for single exoplanets, and how we observe the faintest binary stars (brown dwarfs?) at present.
Loren is offline  
Reply

  My Math Forum > Science Forums > Physics

Tags
exosatellites



Thread Tools
Display Modes






Copyright © 2019 My Math Forum. All rights reserved.