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March 24th, 2019, 07:39 PM   #1
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GMT on Mars planet.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Greenwich_Mean_Time

Is it possible to define Greenwich Mean time (GMT) on other planets?

For example : Mars - Currently explored for Life existence.

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Prashant S Akerkar
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March 24th, 2019, 07:46 PM   #2
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Seeing that the city Greenwich is on Earth, I doubt it. But maybe someone will start a colony.

This is not a Physics question. Please think of using the Lounge, that's what it's there for.

-Dan
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March 25th, 2019, 02:17 AM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by prashantak View Post
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Greenwich_Mean_Time

Is it possible to define Greenwich Mean time (GMT) on other planets?

For example : Mars - Currently explored for Life existence.

Thanks & Regards,
Prashant S Akerkar
We would have to define a separate clock system because a Mars day is not the same length as an Earth day. However, some inspiration could be taken from the UTC system.
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March 25th, 2019, 03:06 AM   #4
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We would have to define a separate clock system because a Mars day is not the same length as an Earth day. However, some inspiration could be taken from the UTC system.
Thanks.

Does it mean that the Mars day is not following the 24 hour length similar to Earth Day and AM, PM?

So Mars day = How many Hours?

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Prashant S Akerkar
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March 25th, 2019, 03:32 AM   #5
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A Mars day is about 24 hours and 37 minutes. Also Mars has a tilted axis of rotation, much as Earth has. Thus a Martian version of GMT, together with a corresponding daylight savings system, could easily be implemented. However, the clocks would be adjusted less frequently (in comparison to clocks on Earth), as the Mars year is very roughly twice as long as an Earth year.
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March 25th, 2019, 04:52 AM   #6
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....as the Mars year is very roughly twice as long as an Earth year.
.....so your annual salary would double?
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March 25th, 2019, 05:29 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by skipjack View Post
A Mars day is about 24 hours and 37 minutes. Also Mars has a tilted axis of rotation, much as Earth has. Thus a Martian version of GMT, together with a corresponding daylight savings system, could easily be implemented. However, the clocks would be adjusted less frequently (in comparison to clocks on Earth), as the Mars year is very roughly twice as long as an Earth year.
Thanks. As you mention, Mars year is very roughly twice as long as an Earth year.

So a Mars year is approximately 365 * 2 days?

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Prashant S Akerkar
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March 25th, 2019, 05:55 AM   #8
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There are about 670 Martian days (which is about 687 Earth days) to a Martian year.
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March 25th, 2019, 06:48 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by skipjack View Post
A Mars day is about 24 hours and 37 minutes. Also Mars has a tilted axis of rotation, much as Earth has. Thus a Martian version of GMT, together with a corresponding daylight savings system, could easily be implemented. However, the clocks would be adjusted less frequently (in comparison to clocks on Earth), as the Mars year is very roughly twice as long as an Earth year.
Why would you bother with "daylight saving"?
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March 26th, 2019, 06:23 AM   #10
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Why would you bother with "daylight saving"?
Martian farmers, obviously
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