My Math Forum  

Go Back   My Math Forum > Science Forums > Physics

Physics Physics Forum


Thanks Tree3Thanks
  • 1 Post By topsquark
  • 1 Post By SenatorArmstrong
  • 1 Post By topsquark
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
February 17th, 2019, 06:18 AM   #1
Newbie
 
Joined: Feb 2019
From: United states

Posts: 9
Thanks: 0

Question How does the magnetic field varies here?

>A uniform beam of positively charged particles is moving with a constant velocity parallel to another beam of negatively charged particles moving with the same velocity but in opposite direction separated by a distance d. Then, how should be the variation of magnetic field B along a perpendicular line drawn between the two beams?(For better view, imagine positive beam to be x-axis and negative beam to be y=1 line.)

I know that there will be electric field and hence the magnetic field. But I don't know how to proceed for the relation

Last edited by Jayant98; February 17th, 2019 at 06:21 AM.
Jayant98 is offline  
 
February 17th, 2019, 07:36 AM   #2
Math Team
 
topsquark's Avatar
 
Joined: May 2013
From: The Astral plane

Posts: 2,079
Thanks: 845

Math Focus: Wibbly wobbly timey-wimey stuff.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jayant98 View Post
>A uniform beam of positively charged particles is moving with a constant velocity parallel to another beam of negatively charged particles moving with the same velocity but in opposite direction separated by a distance d. Then, how should be the variation of magnetic field B along a perpendicular line drawn between the two beams?(For better view, imagine positive beam to be x-axis and negative beam to be y=1 line.)

I know that there will be electric field and hence the magnetic field. But I don't know how to proceed for the relation
This is an application of Ampere's Law. The magnetic field varies radially from each current and you can simply add them.

-Dan
Thanks from SenatorArmstrong
topsquark is offline  
February 17th, 2019, 07:46 AM   #3
Newbie
 
Joined: Feb 2019
From: United states

Posts: 9
Thanks: 0

But it is charge beam and not a current carrying wire or something.

Last edited by Jayant98; February 17th, 2019 at 07:53 AM.
Jayant98 is offline  
February 17th, 2019, 07:54 AM   #4
Newbie
 
Joined: Feb 2019
From: United states

Posts: 9
Thanks: 0

Quote:
Originally Posted by topsquark View Post
This is an application of Ampere's Law. The magnetic field varies radially from each current and you can simply add them.

-Dan
But it's not a current carrying wire. Are both the charge beams same as the current carrying wire?

Last edited by skipjack; February 17th, 2019 at 09:06 AM.
Jayant98 is offline  
February 17th, 2019, 08:33 AM   #5
Senior Member
 
SenatorArmstrong's Avatar
 
Joined: Nov 2015
From: United States of America

Posts: 195
Thanks: 25

Math Focus: Calculus and Physics
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jayant98 View Post
But it is charge beam and not a current carrying wire or something.
Current is defined as:

$I = \frac{dq}{dt}$

When we think about current, typically we think about negatively charge particles (electrons) crossing a perpendicular plane in the wire every time interval dt. If we had positively charged particles (like we do in this problem) moving the same effect would be happening, just the magnetic field direction would be flipped. Use the right hand rule and Amperes law:

$$\oint B\cdot\,ds = ยต_oI_o$$

To investigate this further.
Thanks from topsquark
SenatorArmstrong is offline  
February 17th, 2019, 09:11 AM   #6
Math Team
 
topsquark's Avatar
 
Joined: May 2013
From: The Astral plane

Posts: 2,079
Thanks: 845

Math Focus: Wibbly wobbly timey-wimey stuff.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jayant98 View Post
But it's not a current carrying wire. Are both the charge beams same as the current carrying wire?
A current is defined as a moving set of charges. No one says they have to be constricted to a wire. For example, we can also have charges moving along a surface.

-Dan
Thanks from SenatorArmstrong
topsquark is offline  
Reply

  My Math Forum > Science Forums > Physics

Tags
beams, field, magnetic, varies



Thread Tools
Display Modes


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Magnetic field Marva Physics 1 February 11th, 2018 06:44 PM
Charge in a magnetic field and a electrostatic problem Raphael Physics 0 May 1st, 2012 12:23 PM
Moving proton, Magnetic field, velocity, force FishFace Physics 3 October 27th, 2011 06:39 AM
Compare the magnetic field strength inside & outside the so r-soy Physics 1 February 18th, 2011 11:59 AM
Type the four points about how magnetic field is created r-soy Physics 3 February 6th, 2011 10:15 AM





Copyright © 2019 My Math Forum. All rights reserved.