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February 5th, 2019, 08:08 AM   #1
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What is Heat Radiation.

What is heat radiation?

A standard answer is that it is electromagnetic radiation.

But how can a body consisting of vibrating, electrically neutral particles emit EM radiation?

Or is it that the charges in an atom or molecule are not, in effect, concentrated at a point so there will be net radiation? But then wouldn't a stream of neutral particles emit radiation?

If I had a body consisting solely of vibrating neutrons, would it radiate heat?
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February 5th, 2019, 10:42 AM   #2
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Ok, I'll give you my theory.

It's not electro magnetic. It's gravitational.

An atom in the vicinity of a vibrating atom experiences gravitational excitation and vibrates more itself.

It's a small excitation, but then the excited atom is small.
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February 5th, 2019, 10:55 AM   #3
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What body did you have in mind?
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February 5th, 2019, 11:49 AM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by zylo View Post
Ok, I'll give you my theory.

It's not electro magnetic. It's gravitational.

An atom in the vicinity of a vibrating atom experiences gravitational excitation and vibrates more itself.

It's a small excitation, but then the excited atom is small.
It isn't gravitational radiation, it is EM radiation. We're talking about a matter of scale. We recently detected gravitational waves...but it was given off as the collision of two neutron stars. We could barely measure it. EM waves, on the other hand, are easy to measure.

A macroscopic object is made from protons, neutrons, and electrons. The amount of heat contained in the body can be taken to be from the collective movement. This is more or less a vibration and vibrating atoms give off radiation; an electron will radiate EM waves when it is under an acceleration.

If you had a body made entirely of neutrons it would still radiate EM waves as the constituents are made of quarks, which have a charge.

-Dan
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February 5th, 2019, 04:13 PM   #5
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A neutron is electrically neutral.

If you say it's EM, you have to give the source.

Got it:

It's the result of all the EM radiation from all the vibrating electrons and protons in the body. Since the vibration has a statistical variation, the EM will have a continuous distribution of frequency which can't be measured. It's the continuous distribution of EM radiation which characterizes heat radiation and explains its source from a macroscopically electrically neutral body.

Last edited by zylo; February 5th, 2019 at 04:31 PM.
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February 5th, 2019, 05:48 PM   #6
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Originally Posted by zylo View Post
A neutron is electrically neutral.

If you say it's EM, you have to give the source.

Got it:

It's the result of all the EM radiation from all the vibrating electrons and protons in the body. Since the vibration has a statistical variation, the EM will have a continuous distribution of frequency which can't be measured. It's the continuous distribution of EM radiation which characterizes heat radiation and explains its source from a macroscopically electrically neutral body.
Actually you can get the frequency since in many cases it is quantized. But you've got the main idea.

-Dan
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February 6th, 2019, 05:56 AM   #7
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Actually you can get the frequency since in many cases it is quantized. But you've got the main idea.

-Dan
I'm not talking about orbital frequencies. Electrons in orbit don't radiate. I'm talking about radiation from electrons and protons as the result of thermal vibration.

I found the same answer in wiki in Thermal Radiation. I never would have started this thread if I had found that article before.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thermal_radiation

Last edited by zylo; February 6th, 2019 at 06:18 AM.
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February 6th, 2019, 12:22 PM   #8
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Quote:
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A neutron is electrically neutral.
Yes, but an atomic nucleus isn't just neutrons. What body consisting of neutral particles did you have in mind?
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February 6th, 2019, 12:35 PM   #9
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Yes, but an atomic nucleus isn't just neutrons. What body consisting of neutral particles did you have in mind?
What prompted you to post this irrelevancy 3mins after my last post? Is that how long it took you to come up with something?
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February 6th, 2019, 01:12 PM   #10
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The question was for the benefit of all readers, not just you.
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