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February 6th, 2019, 01:51 PM   #11
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A zylo thread being for the benefit of all people. LOL...
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February 6th, 2019, 02:00 PM   #12
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We see it like the particle is vibrating while the truth is that another one is showing up close to the previous one .(faster than light)

Each vibrating particle with mass , radiates heat .

Last edited by idontknow; February 6th, 2019 at 02:07 PM.
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February 7th, 2019, 07:15 AM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by idontknow View Post

Each vibrating particle with mass , radiates heat .
Provided it has charges, which radiate EM waves.

If it had no charges, presumably it wouldn't radiate heat.

Ck the wiki article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thermal_radiation
which I missed because I googled heat radiation.
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February 7th, 2019, 08:40 AM   #14
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Originally Posted by zylo View Post
Provided it has charges, which radiate EM waves.

If it had no charges, presumably it wouldn't radiate heat.
I don't think anyone is disputing this. Radiation (by photons or EM waves or whatever version you prefer) couples only to charged particles. The neutron is neutral but it has constituents that are charged so the neutron can, in fact, radiate EM waves. (They would be very weak.)

As to neutrinos, yes, there is no radiation. So far as we know neutrons don't have any internal structure. The photon and graviton also fall into this category.

-Dan
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February 7th, 2019, 12:05 PM   #15
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I don't think anyone is disputing this. Radiation (by photons or EM waves or whatever version you prefer) couples only to charged particles. The neutron is neutral but it has constituents that are charged so the neutron can, in fact, radiate EM waves. (They would be very weak.)

As to neutrinos, yes, there is no radiation. So far as we know neutrons don't have any internal structure. The photon and graviton also fall into this category.

-Dan
Sorry, I meant to say "So far as we know neutrinos don't have any internal structure." (Thanks skipjack, for pointing that out.)

-Dan
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February 11th, 2019, 01:53 AM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by zylo View Post
But how can a body consisting of vibrating, electrically neutral particles emit EM radiation?
Although the substance is neutral, all of the constituent parts are neutrons, protons and electrons. Protons and electrons are charged, so interactions are going to occur and kinetic energy can convert to EM radiation, even if the substance as a whole is neutral.

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Or is it that the charges in an atom or molecule are not, in effect, concentrated at a point so there will be net radiation? But then wouldn't a stream of neutral particles emit radiation?
The equipartition theorem states that a substance can require/contribute energy according to the number of degrees of freedom available in the substance. For example, a monatomic gas will contribute 3 degrees of freedom (translational modes), whereas a diatomic gas at very low temperature can contribute 5 (translational + rotational modes) and 7 at high temperature (translational+ rotational + vibrational modes).

Thermodynamics usually deals with macroscopic scales, so the black-body distribution is the one obtained from experiments on various substances. At the microscopic scale, kinetic theory is dominant.

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If I had a body consisting solely of vibrating neutrons, would it radiate heat?
Yes (neutron stars emit thermal radiation), but it doesn't look like the usual black-body radiation because neutrons interact with each other due to the strong force rather than the EM force. The situation is very complex because the equation of state of neutron stars is complex. It's a current research topic.

Note also that neutrons can be considered as a kind of radiation, so it's likely that a collection of neutrons will emit heat in the form of escaping neutrons.
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Last edited by skipjack; February 11th, 2019 at 04:14 AM.
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