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December 9th, 2018, 04:07 PM   #1
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Help me Don't know where to start

Anyone Help.I'm just trying to learn before going back to college. Come to my aid.



A sphere of radius 5cm weighing 60N,is kept in equilibrium with one point in contact with a smooth wall and another length 8cm to a point vertically above the point of contact. Calculate the tension in the string and reaction of the wall.
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December 11th, 2018, 04:01 AM   #2
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What string?

Is there a string attached to the sphere directly above the spot where the wall is in contact with the sphere?

If so, figure out where you should draw the vectors of the three forces and what their directions are. You should assume a frictionless contact between the wall and the sphere.

When you draw your picture, remember that a well-known pythagorean condition applies.

When you have the forces and their directions, they have two conditions that they must fulfill. I noticed you already got some help from the other topic, so these instructions will be worth a ton more for you than a solution. If I calculated corectly, i got 37,5 N for both.

You can start by asking yourself, why must they be of equal magnitude. (Taking they are directed how they are...)
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