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October 10th, 2018, 03:52 AM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NAC54321 View Post
Studiot thanks for your reply.

I didn't look at this last night only now seeing it.
I have always calculated speed by distance / time.

Skipjack has helped greatly with the table and now it makes more sense, I am just trying to work out how each is derived.

Here is a good derivation.

Unfortunately skip has the specific heat the wrong way round.

http://i1.dainikbhaskar.com/web2imag...3659_13897.pdf


My question last night was designed to get some more information.
I do/did not know how much you know or where you were coming from.

Thus the question about speed because we can derive a whole chain of examples from this.

We can continue this if you like.

Also it is possible to place the units/dimensions of a quantity once known into an equation to extend the list, as skip says.

So specific heat is the amount of energy to raise 1 kg of substance one degree Kelvin (or Celcius)

The specific heat capacity of something is the amount of heat required to raise that something one degree K
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October 11th, 2018, 12:59 AM   #12
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It seems that I gave the correct information for specific heat capacity, but that specific heat means exactly the same thing as specific heat capacity and therefore has the same dimensional formula. I recall learning the term "specific heat" at school, and it was only recently that I came across "specific heat capacity", which seems to be the more common term nowadays.
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October 11th, 2018, 03:05 AM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by skipjack View Post
It seems that I gave the correct information for specific heat capacity, but that specific heat means exactly the same thing as specific heat capacity and therefore has the same dimensional formula. I recall learning the term "specific heat" at school, and it was only recently that I came across "specific heat capacity", which seems to be the more common term nowadays.
Really this is not a Maths question but should have been dealt with in Physics (best) or at least the applied Maths section.

Here is a short extract from one of the most successful Thermodynamics texts ever.

Basic Engineering Thermodynamics by Joel

Quote:
Specific Quantity
In the discussion of those properties which were associated with the mass of a substance are called extensive properties.
For convenience. at times, it is useful to discuss the properties of a unit mass of substance. To indicate that this is the case, the word specific is used to prefix the property. Thus, the specific volume of a substance at some particular state, is the volume that unit mass of the substance will occupy at that particular state.
Other specific quantities will be discussed in the text
I think this is a pretty good explanation.
Specific volume is the reciprocal of density and much used in Thermodynamics, Fluid Mechanics and Soil Mechanics.

I note an extra 'specific' crept in mistakenly in my last post.

Quote:
Studiot
The specific heat capacity of something is the amount of heat required to raise that something one degree K
That should just have been the heat capacity.

My apologies.


So yes 'specific heat' is short for 'specific heat capacity'.

Last edited by skipjack; October 11th, 2018 at 06:09 AM.
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October 11th, 2018, 06:10 AM   #14
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I've moved this to Physics.
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