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May 31st, 2018, 03:01 PM   #1
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Big bang, quasars, supernovae -- similarities

How are the big bang, quasars and supernovae similar?
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May 31st, 2018, 06:43 PM   #2
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they aren't particularly similar
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May 31st, 2018, 08:22 PM   #3
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They create quarks and other ultra-high-energy particles, approach the limits of space-time and on their spatial scales are most powerful entities.

Anything else?
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May 31st, 2018, 09:25 PM   #4
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And quite explosive!
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June 1st, 2018, 02:20 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Loren View Post
They create quarks and other ultra-high-energy particles, approach the limits of space-time and on their spatial scales are most powerful entities.

Anything else?
Just to be clarify, supernovae are sites for nucleosynthesis (not quark creation) and only the very massive explosions need relativistic corrections (stars with initial masses greater than 35 solar masses if I can recall correctly).

I can't think of anything else... maybe AGN, but they don't create quarks.
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June 3rd, 2018, 05:28 AM   #6
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How are the big bang.....
If there was NOTHING, then suddenly the Big Bang,
then WHAT banged?!
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June 3rd, 2018, 12:11 PM   #7
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If there was NOTHING, then suddenly the Big Bang,
then WHAT banged?!
If I understand what I read of theoretical cosmology these days it wasn't a bang so much as a bounce. What bounced? Spacetime itself.
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June 3rd, 2018, 12:25 PM   #8
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If I understand what I read of theoretical cosmology these days it wasn't a bang so much as a bounce. What bounced? Spacetime itself.
...but, but, but it bounced off WHAT?...there wuzz nuttin to bounce off
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June 6th, 2018, 04:13 AM   #9
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If there was NOTHING, then suddenly the Big Bang,
then WHAT banged?!
The big bang theory shouldn't be confused with cosmogenesis. The former doesn't assume that there was nothing before it, but instead asserts that whatever was there had to lead to a rapid expansion of the Universe and matter-radiation decoupling (because of the cosmic microwave background).

As for cosmogenesis? Well, some people think some sort of supernatural sky wizard did some hocus pocus and magically made stuff. No one can disprove that idea, but it seems rather silly to me. My personal preference is that someone in the matrix divided by zero.
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June 6th, 2018, 04:31 AM   #10
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It's impossible that there was a "start", so there never was "nothing".
Therefore universe always existed...something we'll never
be able to explain.
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