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-   -   Big bang, quasars, supernovae -- similarities (http://mymathforum.com/physics/344336-big-bang-quasars-supernovae-similarities.html)

Loren May 31st, 2018 02:01 PM

Big bang, quasars, supernovae -- similarities
 
How are the big bang, quasars and supernovae similar?

romsek May 31st, 2018 05:43 PM

they aren't particularly similar

Loren May 31st, 2018 07:22 PM

They create quarks and other ultra-high-energy particles, approach the limits of space-time and on their spatial scales are most powerful entities.

Anything else?

Loren May 31st, 2018 08:25 PM

And quite explosive!

Benit13 June 1st, 2018 01:20 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Loren (Post 595076)
They create quarks and other ultra-high-energy particles, approach the limits of space-time and on their spatial scales are most powerful entities.

Anything else?

Just to be clarify, supernovae are sites for nucleosynthesis (not quark creation) and only the very massive explosions need relativistic corrections (stars with initial masses greater than 35 solar masses if I can recall correctly).

I can't think of anything else... maybe AGN, but they don't create quarks.

Denis June 3rd, 2018 04:28 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Loren (Post 595065)
How are the big bang.....

If there was NOTHING, then suddenly the Big Bang,
then WHAT banged?!:ninja:

romsek June 3rd, 2018 11:11 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Denis (Post 595144)
If there was NOTHING, then suddenly the Big Bang,
then WHAT banged?!:ninja:

If I understand what I read of theoretical cosmology these days it wasn't a bang so much as a bounce. What bounced? Spacetime itself.

Denis June 3rd, 2018 11:25 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by romsek (Post 595154)
If I understand what I read of theoretical cosmology these days it wasn't a bang so much as a bounce. What bounced? Spacetime itself.

...but, but, but it bounced off WHAT?...there wuzz nuttin to bounce off :ninja:

Benit13 June 6th, 2018 03:13 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Denis (Post 595144)
If there was NOTHING, then suddenly the Big Bang,
then WHAT banged?!:ninja:

The big bang theory shouldn't be confused with cosmogenesis. The former doesn't assume that there was nothing before it, but instead asserts that whatever was there had to lead to a rapid expansion of the Universe and matter-radiation decoupling (because of the cosmic microwave background).

As for cosmogenesis? Well, some people think some sort of supernatural sky wizard did some hocus pocus and magically made stuff. No one can disprove that idea, but it seems rather silly to me. My personal preference is that someone in the matrix divided by zero.

Denis June 6th, 2018 03:31 AM

It's impossible that there was a "start", so there never was "nothing".
Therefore universe always existed...something we'll never
be able to explain.


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