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May 27th, 2018, 05:54 PM   #1
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Spherical solar systems?

Solar systems have dynamics similar to galaxies.

There are many elliptical galaxies.

Are there solar systems which maintain several substantially oblique (or perhaps "random") planetary orbits?
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May 27th, 2018, 06:36 PM   #2
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Our own solar system has many comets with highly elliptical orbits.
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May 27th, 2018, 08:28 PM   #3
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But they are mostly (more or less) in the plane of the system, aren't they? I think the question is not so much about eccentricity of orbit as the angle to the plane of the system.
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May 27th, 2018, 09:20 PM   #4
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The chaotic satellites might allow extreme ellipses, but not much in the way of skews from the orbital plane (averaged out over many bodies in galaxies)?
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May 27th, 2018, 09:53 PM   #5
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Turns out that some of our sun's comets approach from random angles.

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The inclination of a comet's orbit with respect to the ecliptic (approximately, the plane spanned by the orbits of the major planets) depends on the origin of the comet. Long-period comets come from the Oort's cloud; since Oort's cloud is spherical, long-period comets approach the inner solar system at random angles as you correctly guessed (note that their orbit can be majorly perturbed as they pass near the giant planets). Short-period comets originate in Kuiper's belt and orbit roughly along the plane of the ecliptic.
do all comets approach the sun along the plane of the ecliptic [Ask An Astronomer]
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May 27th, 2018, 10:00 PM   #6
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Does the three-body approximation approach freedom of rotation in 3d space?
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May 29th, 2018, 02:31 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Loren View Post
Solar systems have dynamics similar to galaxies.
In a way, yes, but there's a lot more to galactic dynamics than with solar system dynamics since there's a considerable amount of matter; trying to solve something like a galaxy with N-body gravity code is just unfeasible.

Quote:
There are many elliptical galaxies.

Are there solar systems which maintain several substantially oblique (or perhaps "random") planetary orbits?
I think the current theory suggests that planetary bodies, which form from the protostellar disk, will always be in a plane. However, at the edges of the system you're going to find more objects undergoing orbits out of the plane.
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