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August 19th, 2017, 11:17 AM   #1
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About the math involved in some physics equations ?

I have some questions about the kind of math involved in some physics equations .

Someone said many physics equations involve Ordinary and Partial differential equations

What sort of Ordinary or Partial differential equations are involved in Maxwell equations and Schrodinger equations ?

These are some rough notes i made while trying to learn differential equations and programming

I am not sure if the things i wrote down are right ?


Quote:

Derivative is the rate of change of the dependent variable y with respect to the independent variable x , which is a number

Differential equations are equations which involve one or more derivatives or the rate of change of the dependent variable y with respect to the independent variable x , or dy/dx , which is a number ...

Which is a number in an unknown function

Partial derivative


The character ∂ is a stylized d mainly used as a mathematical symbol to denote a partial derivative such as ∂z / ∂x (read as "the partial derivative of z with respect to x")
A derivative of a function of two or more variables with respect to one variable , the other(s) being treated as a constant


Partial differential equation

An equation containing one or more partial derivatives .
The character ∂ is a stylized d mainly used as a mathematical symbol to denote a partial derivative such as ∂z / ∂x (read as "the partial derivative of z with respect to x")
Quote:
Ordinary differential equations for ex dy/dx tells something about the relation between dependent variable y to the independent variable x ... which is a number of a certain variables in an unknown function

Partial differential equations for ex SquigglyDy/dx tells something about the relation between dependent variable y to the independent variable x ... which is a number of a certain variables in an unknown function
What does the variables in those equations represent ?
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August 19th, 2017, 01:47 PM   #2
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For physicists the variables are whatever is being considered, such as time, length, energy, etc. The mathematical treatment doesn't require any knowledge of physical meaning.
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August 19th, 2017, 02:15 PM   #3
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Thanks . The things i wrote down inside the quotes are sort of OK too right ?

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