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August 10th, 2017, 02:20 AM   #1
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Ball dynamics -- lift, drag

The maximum distance traveled by a ball (without lift, drag or spin) is when it projects 45 degrees from a flat surface.

What function of lift vs. drag (with the 45 degree angle of projection) would show the ball to travel that same distance?
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August 10th, 2017, 03:28 AM   #2
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You'll never be able to get the same distance travelled by introducing air resistance unless you add some other force (e.g. by making the projectile a rocket).

If you want to determine what that force should be be in order to get the situation back to the no-resistance result, you're going to get a time-dependent force that will depend on your air resistance prescription you choose. Since air resistance problems are very difficult to solve analytically, you'll probably have to resort to numerical solutions.
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August 10th, 2017, 10:23 AM   #3
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Could just a little friction with considerable lift allow the ball to travel at least the original maximum distance?
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August 10th, 2017, 04:07 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Loren View Post
Could just a little friction with considerable lift allow the ball to travel at least the original maximum distance?
Are you asking about the Magnus effect?

https://www.google.co.uk/search?hl=e...26.0soT4Owl0AA
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August 11th, 2017, 02:29 AM   #5
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Quote:
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Could just a little friction with considerable lift allow the ball to travel at least the original maximum distance?
The direction of the drag is always against the motion, so no, you're always going to impede the projectile.

Studiot's post is interesting, but I don't know if a projectile experiencing bottom-spin in a medium would travel further than a projectile with no spin in a vacuum. The result would be interesting
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August 11th, 2017, 04:51 AM   #6
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The direction of the drag is always against the motion, so no, you're always going to impede the projectile.

Studiot's post is interesting, but I don't know if a projectile experiencing bottom-spin in a medium would travel further than a projectile with no spin in a vacuum. The result would be interesting
Table Tennis is the ultimate sport to demonstrate this.

Compared to a no spin ball,

Topspin lowers the vertex of the trajectory but lengthens its length.

Backspin raises the vertex of the trajectory but shortens its length.
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