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June 27th, 2017, 09:37 AM   #11
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Thanks again for the replies ,

The good thing is i somehow got a copy of that book ,

Hugh D Young_ Roger A Freedman_ Albert Lewis Ford-Sears and Zemansky's university physics _ with modern physics-Addison-Wesley 13th Edition

It looks great , i was not expecting this .It has lot of images , i was expecting something else .I was expecting the normal textbook like text .But this one is different .

I am going to buy a hard copy of this book too .

Wow now i can get two physics books
These two books together i can get a lot of information .

I have this one more strange question to ask .

What do you think of a passion fruit flower ? To me it looks like an electron .


Which is why the interest in particles and physics
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June 27th, 2017, 08:13 PM   #12
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T
What do you think of a passion fruit flower ? To me it looks like an electron .


Which is why the interest in particles and physics
Why do you think it looks like an electron? And which electron model might you be referring to.
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June 28th, 2017, 01:45 AM   #13
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Thanks again for the replies ,

The good thing is i somehow got a copy of that book ,

Hugh D Young_ Roger A Freedman_ Albert Lewis Ford-Sears and Zemansky's university physics _ with modern physics-Addison-Wesley 13th Edition

It looks great , i was not expecting this .It has lot of images , i was expecting something else .I was expecting the normal textbook like text .But this one is different .
No problem It really is an awesome book.

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I have this one more strange question to ask .

What do you think of a passion fruit flower ? To me it looks like an electron .

Which is why the interest in particles and physics
I think what you might be referring to is the probability density function of electron states in hydrogen. What surprises most people is that only the s quantum state is spherical. The other states (p, d, f, etc.), which are states due to increases in angular momentum, yield probability density functions that are non-spherical, which lead to interesting behaviour when it comes to collision dynamics and analysis of chemical reaction rates. The functions tend look like lobes rather than flower petals however.

See for example: The Hydrogen Atom - The Probability Distribution of the Hydrogen Atom
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June 28th, 2017, 07:50 AM   #14
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Why do you think it looks like an electron? And which electron model might you be referring to.
The only electron model i know is that of the electron revolving around the proton from my old physics textbooks and some YouTube documentaries .

The documentaries these days shows the atom with loads of unknown particles .

All those things put together looks like this flower to me .



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No problem It really is an awesome book.



I think what you might be referring to is the probability density function of electron states in hydrogen. What surprises most people is that only the s quantum state is spherical. The other states (p, d, f, etc.), which are states due to increases in angular momentum, yield probability density functions that are non-spherical, which lead to interesting behaviour when it comes to collision dynamics and analysis of chemical reaction rates. The functions tend look like lobes rather than flower petals however.

See for example: The Hydrogen Atom - The Probability Distribution of the Hydrogen Atom
I still don't know after all these years and going through a computer science degree , why an electron is in orbit with a lot of empty space between it .


Isn't that a bit too mysterious ?

Am i getting the wrong knowledge or way too many people ignorant or don't see the mysteriousness of concepts like those ?

Anyway , thanks a lot of the explanations .
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June 28th, 2017, 08:03 AM   #15
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I still don't know after all these years and going through a computer science degree , why an electron is in orbit with a lot of empty space between it .
Electrons don't really 'orbit' the nucleus as such, 'they' are more like a cloud who has different energy levels at different locations (not discrete locations). However, the orbiting electron model depiction is more useful and easier to imagine when first starting out.
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June 28th, 2017, 10:57 AM   #16
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There are two American texts that have been in competition for several decades.

The texts by Sears an Zemansky, which have already been mentioned and the texts by

Resnick and Halliday, which are much prettier.

The R & H text avoids difficulties in the physics and makes deeper understanding difficult.
I see many students with poor understanding as a result.

The S and Z text by contrast have many remarkably simple and clear explanations of the difficult bits, as well as the easy bits.

Further it comes in modular form (Optics, Mechanics, Electricity etc), as well as one big book.
There are also several version of the big book. The full university vesion and a simplified, more practical college version.



Another author who offers some very good reading at this level is Arthur Beiser. He has several texts which include some much more modern material.



A final offering based on this quote of yours

Quote:
What do you think of a passion fruit flower ? To me it looks like an electron .
You should read

The Self Made Tapestry by Ball
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Last edited by studiot; June 28th, 2017 at 11:01 AM.
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June 29th, 2017, 05:15 AM   #17
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Quote:
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Electrons don't really 'orbit' the nucleus as such, 'they' are more like a cloud who has different energy levels at different locations (not discrete locations). However, the orbiting electron model depiction is more useful and easier to imagine when first starting out.
Thanks again for the explanations ,

Anyway inside a computer electrons looks like google glass 'stuck inside a transistor .

Until the invention of google glass it was a bit hard imagining binary 1,0 inside computers .

Quote:
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There are two American texts that have been in competition for several decades.

The texts by Sears an Zemansky, which have already been mentioned and the texts by

Resnick and Halliday, which are much prettier.

The R & H text avoids difficulties in the physics and makes deeper understanding difficult.
I see many students with poor understanding as a result.

The S and Z text by contrast have many remarkably simple and clear explanations of the difficult bits, as well as the easy bits.

Further it comes in modular form (Optics, Mechanics, Electricity etc), as well as one big book.
There are also several version of the big book. The full university vesion and a simplified, more practical college version.



Another author who offers some very good reading at this level is Arthur Beiser. He has several texts which include some much more modern material.



A final offering based on this quote of yours



You should read

The Self Made Tapestry by Ball
studiot ,

Thanks a lot , i will try to buy that book too
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June 29th, 2017, 05:17 AM   #18
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Originally Posted by awholenumber View Post

Anyway inside a computer electrons looks like google glass 'stuck inside a transistor .

Until the invention of google glass it was a bit hard imagining binary 1,0 inside computers .
Hmm...
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June 29th, 2017, 06:03 AM   #19
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Thanks again for the explanations ,

Anyway inside a computer electrons looks like google glass 'stuck inside a transistor .

Until the invention of google glass it was a bit hard imagining binary 1,0 inside computers .
Eh?

If I were you I'd go and read the books you've just bought
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June 29th, 2017, 07:01 AM   #20
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Don't listen to them, Ball is a good book to fire the imagination.

If you are only one tenth as good as your late countryman, Bose, you will be very good indeed.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jagadish_Chandra_Bose
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