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March 2nd, 2017, 01:24 AM   #1
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Relative velocities

Hello.

I have started studying about relativity, I got some question that made me curious to know about it deeply.

If we have 2 cars on the road, car A moving at speed 100, car B moving at speed 110, if car B tagged car A.
Will it be the same impact or the damage done if car A was at speed 50 and car B at speed 60?
Considering the two cars are identical.

Is there motion is relative?
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March 2nd, 2017, 02:20 AM   #2
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Damage directly from the impact of the two cars would be the same.

However, during more serious collisions, the drivers lose control of the car and it can spin/slide/skid and collide with one or more objects in the environment (such as trees, rocks, other cars, the dual carriage-way barrier, etc.). If this happens, the relative speed between those cars and objects in the environment objects would be greater in the first scenario.
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March 6th, 2017, 03:50 AM   #3
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Relative Velocities

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Originally Posted by Benit13 View Post
Damage directly from the impact of the two cars would be the same.

However, during more serious collisions, the drivers lose control of the car and it can spin/slide/skid and collide with one or more objects in the environment (such as trees, rocks, other cars, the dual carriage-way barrier, etc.). If this happens, the relative speed between those cars and objects in the environment objects would be greater in the first scenario.
So in the absence of a force, an object moves with constant velocity? or velocity will be change?
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March 6th, 2017, 04:05 AM   #4
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Originally Posted by JamSmith View Post
So in the absence of a force, an object moves with constant velocity? or velocity will be change?
It will remain at constant velocity due to Newton's first law:

- If the forces on an object are balanced (i.e. there is a zero net force), an object will remain at constant velocity (or stationary if that velocity is zero).
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