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December 16th, 2015, 04:06 AM   #1
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Is space empty ?

any sugest ? idontknow it
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December 16th, 2015, 07:41 AM   #2
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Dark matter is now understood to fill what would otherwise be considered to be empty space.

'Cosmologists at Penn Weigh Cosmic Filaments and Voids'
Penn News | Cosmologists at Penn Weigh Cosmic Filaments and Voids

"Dark matter ... permeate[s] all the way to the center of the voids."

'No Empty Space in the Universe --Dark Matter Discovered to Fill Intergalactic Space'
"No Empty Space in the Universe" --Dark Matter Discovered to Fill Intergalactic Space

"A long standing mystery on where the missing dark matter is has been solved by the research. There is no empty space in the universe. The intergalactic space is filled with dark matter."

Dark matter which fills the space unoccupied by particles of matter is displaced by the particles of matter which exist in it and move through it.

Particles of matter move through and displace the dark matter, including 'particles' as large as galaxies and galaxy clusters.

'The Milky Way's dark matter halo appears to be lopsided'
[0903.3802] The Milky Way's dark matter halo appears to be lopsided

"the emerging picture of the dark matter halo of the Milky Way is dominantly lopsided in nature."

The Milky Way's halo is not a clump of dark matter traveling along with the Milky Way. The Milky Way's halo is lopsided due to the matter in the Milky Way moving through and displacing the dark matter, analogous to a submarine moving through and displacing the water.
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December 16th, 2015, 08:07 AM   #3
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You don't have any reference to support your displacement idea.
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December 16th, 2015, 08:11 AM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by v8archie View Post
You don't have any reference to support your displacement idea.
There is evidence dark matter is displaced by matter every time a double slit experiment is performed; it's what waves.
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December 16th, 2015, 09:03 AM   #5
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What is your reference for that?
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December 16th, 2015, 09:19 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by v8archie View Post
What is your reference for that?
Let's start with chaos theory.

NON-LINEAR WAVE MECHANICS A CAUSAL INTERPRETATION by LOUIS DE BROGLIE

“Since 1954, when this passage was written, I have come to support wholeheartedly an hypothesis proposed by Bohm and Vigier. According to this hypothesis, the random perturbations to which the particle would be constantly subjected, and which would have the probability of presence in terms of [the wave-function wave], arise from the interaction of the particle with a “subquantic medium” which escapes our observation and is entirely chaotic, and which is everywhere present in what we call “empty space”.”

The “subquantic medium” is the dark matter.

‘Fluid mechanics suggests alternative to quantum orthodoxy’
Fluid mechanics suggests alternative to quantum orthodoxy | MIT News

“The fluidic pilot-wave system is also chaotic. It’s impossible to measure a bouncing droplet’s position accurately enough to predict its trajectory very far into the future. But in a recent series of papers, Bush, MIT professor of applied mathematics Ruben Rosales, and graduate students Anand Oza and Dan Harris applied their pilot-wave theory to show how chaotic pilot-wave dynamics leads to the quantumlike statistics observed in their experiments.”

A “fluidic pilot-wave system” is the dark matter.

‘When Fluid Dynamics Mimic Quantum Mechanics’
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases...0729111934.htm

“If you have a system that is deterministic and is what we call in the business ‘chaotic,’ or sensitive to initial conditions, sensitive to perturbations, then it can behave probabilistically,” Milewski continues. “Experiments like this weren’t available to the giants of quantum mechanics. They also didn’t know anything about chaos. Suppose these guys — who were puzzled by why the world behaves in this strange probabilistic way — actually had access to experiments like this and had the knowledge of chaos, would they have come up with an equivalent, deterministic theory of quantum mechanics, which is not the current one? That’s what I find exciting from the quantum perspective.”


What waves in a double slit experiment is the dark matter.

The following hydrodynamical representation of the Casimir Effect is analogous to the chaotic nature of the dark matter. It is the chaotic nature of the dark matter which causes the Casimir effect.

'Water wave analogue of the Casimir effect'



It is the chaotic nature of the dark matter which leads to the probabilistic results of experiments.

Last edited by mpc755; December 16th, 2015 at 09:35 AM.
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December 22nd, 2015, 02:57 PM   #7
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If space was empty how can we have solar winds?
Space like dark matter, may be hard for us to see, but most likely still must exist..
I feel space displacement, causes gravity. Other than electro magnetism.
Though electro magnetism, can cause a magnetic vacuum. How can it cause a vacuum if there is nothing to vacuum?
What if Space or Dark Matter, was comprised of matter that is a size that makes Planck's Constant look huge.
Dr. David Bohm , a student of Einstein was considered somewhat of a looney such as I am. Though I find his work with infinite progression of size, right on.

Take a 2D hologram, break off a piece of it. You will see the entire image of the hologram
in the little piece you break off, Infinite progression of size goes in two directions, larger and smaller.
Let me know when science finds something that is infinitely small, with their machines.
I think it may take a while.
Something too small for us to see as humans, may and most likely does exist, even though we cannot see it, even with our glasses on.

As I mentioned from a different post.
If you take one cubic meter, and cut it in half, and repeat this only 111 times, you will end up at the size of Planck's Constant. This looney figured that out on his own.
Anyone that feels it stops somewhere, may be more of a looney than me.
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December 22nd, 2015, 03:27 PM   #8
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I suppose it depends what you mean by 'empty'. Even atoms are well over 99.9% 'empty' space. But this 'empty' space is filled with subatomic fields and mysteriously teleporting particles. Energy and forces abound in a vacuum. In outer space there will still be electromagnetic waves of various kinds, from the sun and on a more galactic level. There is, of course, light. And obviously the force of gravity is universal. So, empty of matter, sure (although dark matter clearly accounts for over 80% of the universe's mass). But really empty?

Last edited by Relentless; December 22nd, 2015 at 03:31 PM.
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December 22nd, 2015, 06:44 PM   #9
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I am considering the term you use when relating to atoms, being empty space. It may be that this empty space, may only appear to be empty, because of the relative size to this much larger mass it relates to. The protons are thousands of times larger that the electrons are. So this so called empty space may be thousands of times smaller mass than the electrons are?
This is not an argument, this is only, a discussion of my views on this subject.
This relating Space to a infinite progression of mass or area, that we can only measure or see on a huge combined level. Such as we can see the beach, but we cannot see the grains of sand, that comprise it. What are your views on empty space being too small
for us to view on an individual basis of size of matter. Though we know it exists from our 80 percent combined mass readings.
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December 22nd, 2015, 07:26 PM   #10
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A quick search (Questions and Answers - What are the exact relative masses of protons, neutrons and electrons?) indicates that protons are the size of about 1836 electrons, while neutrons are nearly 1839 electrons. But a good rule of thumb for any atom is that its nucleus is one hundred thousandth the volume of the atom (where the atom is defined as the 90% certainty range for the electrons I think, since they can't be located precisely). So basically that means 99.999% of all matter consists of nothing but forces, which, depending on your point of view, makes it empty.

Are you talking about vision, or about the travel of light? The grains of sand problem doesn't seem very interesting to me (although it's the subject of an interesting philosophical problem); at a far distance, we can only discern generalisations. Fair enough. It's more interesting that over very long distances we see things as they were a long time ago; when the light first set out on its journey. But neither is perplexing.
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