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January 4th, 2016, 06:53 AM   #21
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Please look at this attached picture. Any real area can always be considered a relative infinite area, because we can always get smaller infinitely from any starting area or mass.
I hope this will help relate, our seen mass to unseen Space.
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January 4th, 2016, 07:36 AM   #22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mark eaton24 View Post
Please look at this attached picture.
Any real area can always be considered a relative infinite area, because we can always get smaller infinitely from any starting area or mass.

What are you on about? Nothing in your post makes sense and is totally irrelevant to the OP's original post.
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January 5th, 2016, 08:20 AM   #23
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Originally Posted by v8archie View Post
I don't see any problem with the text presented in that article. To me, anyone sufficiently intelligent to understand the report would read "here's an unverified anomalous result, and here are the consequences if it turned out to be true.
Which one? There were 5 presented on that reddit page.

Quote:
The author states that the most significant evidence countering this experiment would be known by an undergraduate in the field, so it's not surprising that most articles don't mention it. It's more surprising that one of them does.
The problem is that the articles were not only aimed at physics undergraduates... they were aimed at everybody. The way science is reported to the Layman needs to be carefully presented and in the case of the OPERA results, it wasn't; the usual sensationalism appeared.

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Also, I was under the impression that there is no theoretical reason why a particle can't travel faster than light. Only that if it does, it can't slow down to the speed of light or slower.
No particle that carries "information" (i.e. mass, energy or momentum) can travel faster than the speed of light because even with infinite energy, you would only accelerate the particle closer and closer to that limit. Relativity imposes the limit.

Tachyons were invented with the sole purpose of performing thought experiments on what would happen if a particle could travel faster than the speed of light, but there is no evidence for them. I guess it would be hard to create a theory where some hypothetical faster than light particle slowed down to sub-light speeds that wouldn't break what we already know.

Btw, I found an interesting article on the Arxiv about the speed of light
http://arxiv.org/pdf/astro-ph/0703751.pdf

Last edited by Benit13; January 5th, 2016 at 08:30 AM.
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January 18th, 2016, 09:27 PM   #24
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Tesla Quoted: All of my investigations point to the conclusion that they are small particles, each carrying so small a charge that we are justified in calling them neutrons. They move with great velocity, exceeding that of light. July 10th 1932.
Please watch on You Tube, Nikola Tesla, everything is light, interview with Nikola Tesla.
I think this will help anyone.
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January 19th, 2016, 01:54 AM   #25
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The most likely cause of the requirement for dark matter would be if we are doing the math wrong.

I think this is the case. I think our understanding of the physical property of direction can stand some improvement.

A new geometric equality which quantifies direction exclusively, without any other metric, should prove to be useful in this regard. This new function has been found.

Last edited by steveupson; January 19th, 2016 at 01:58 AM.
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