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March 28th, 2013, 03:53 AM   #11
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Re: Can we add infinite frequency bits simultaneously

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Originally Posted by Hedge
Not sure I see how it works for adding or subtraction, or how it solves any fundamental problems of computing.

I mean, if you put the frequency vibration for 4 and 5 on top of each other, the interference between them falls on points that fit a frequency of 20, I see that. But that's a multiplication.

Personally I think it is a fun way to think about numbers but probably not as amazing as it is seeming to you right now.
Hedge scooped me on multiplication.

Show me how adding frequency waves to frequency waves is faster than adding (or multiplying) number to number for a group of, say, 5 numbers.

I'm no computer scientist, but it would seem for computing, you still need a way to create the relevant ways and a way of combining them And it's not obvious how the waves could REALLY be combined simultaneously rather than wave by wave.
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March 28th, 2013, 04:18 AM   #12
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Re: Can we add infinite frequency bits simultaneously

Ok, I subjected myself to the whole video this time. Your representations of numbers that are not powers of 2 as having no set wavelength is the wavelength analog of one particular broken stick procedure. Take one stick. Break it in half and you have two sticks. Break one of the halves in half and you have 3 sticks. Break the other half in half and you have four sticks. Break one quarter stick in half and you have five. Break another quarter and you have 6. Another and you have 7. The last one and you have eight. Continue breaking eighths into sixteenths, then thirty-secongds, sixty-fourths ad infinitum and you can get a crude representation for every number. Every break means ONE more stick than before, as it is simply an iteration of breaking 1 into 2 at smaller and smaller levels while holding all else the same. Surely THIS much is nothing revolutionary.

To talk about waves, we will have to talk about pulses to describe your system, where a pulse is of a set period - 1 in your system - that contains a group of waves with each possible group assigned to a set number. All of your actual waves are of the for 1/(2^n), ie the inverses of the powers of two. You represent 3 as a wave of wavelength 1/2 followed by 2 of wavelength 1/4. 5 involves 3 three waves of length 1/4 followed by two of length 1/8. And so on. So, what actually happens when the pulses for 3 and 5 are combined? How about 3, 5 and 7? And, going back to your original query, are the waves really all combined at once, or just one at a time?
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March 28th, 2013, 04:35 AM   #13
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Re: Can we add infinite frequency bits simultaneously

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Originally Posted by johnr
You represent 3 as a wave of wavelength 1/2 followed by 2 of wavelength 1/4. 5 involves 3 three waves of length 1/4 followed by two of length 1/8. And so on. So, what actually happens when the pulses for 3 and 5 are combined? How about 3, 5 and 7? And, going back to your original query, are the waves really all combined at once, or just one at a time?
Oh, I see, I think I gave up in confusion at that point. Yes, that isn't much help really, if we are talking about real physical frequencies.

Even on the multiplication I'm not that convinced - 4 and 5 interfere on a 20 frequency but also on the frequency for any multiple of 20, (and, up to a point on multiples of 10) so it only picks out an arithmetic progression, if there were a clear way of interpreting the data in the first instance.
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March 28th, 2013, 04:41 AM   #14
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Re: Can we add infinite frequency bits simultaneously

Quote:
Originally Posted by Hedge
Quote:
Originally Posted by johnr
You represent 3 as a wave of wavelength 1/2 followed by 2 of wavelength 1/4. 5 involves 3 three waves of length 1/4 followed by two of length 1/8. And so on. So, what actually happens when the pulses for 3 and 5 are combined? How about 3, 5 and 7? And, going back to your original query, are the waves really all combined at once, or just one at a time?
Oh, I see, I think I gave up in confusion at that point. Yes, that isn't much help really, if we are talking about real physical frequencies.

Even on the multiplication I'm not that convinced - 4 and 5 interfere on a 20 frequency but also on the frequency for any multiple of 20, (and, up to a point on multiples of 10) so it only picks out an arithmetic progression, if there were a clear way of interpreting the data in the first instance.
Yes, your way holds out promise of revealing at least some interesting things. Not sure that this other way does. But I am open to being convinced. I'm not much of a "wavologist"!
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September 23rd, 2013, 05:43 PM   #15
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Re: Can we add infinite frequency bits simultaneously

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Originally Posted by johnr
Can you give just ONE actual example of what you think you can do with waves that you can't do without them?
Sorry been away working on this To answer your question...

we can perform Many Calculations occur inside of a Single Calculation by using waves.
We can add the numbers in Series, meaning the number is Longer ( Longer Play Back time) So we can Solve Y and Z in the equation, X = Y + Z...the Answer is the Question in Serries. If we add the Numbers Parallel, they Become Louder and Faster, meaning the Time for the 2 Frequency is the same as a single Frequency Bit, but It they are Squished together, so it is Louder and Faster.

Here is the Updated website as well! http://ashesmi.yolasite.com/fractal-binary.php

Using waves as how I do the 2 Base Log with this Equation....

http://ashesmi.yolasite.com/resource...0s860x2243.png

Using Waves is Amazing...Will Be Updating the site with new understandings of this, it is Fractal but it is "1", Fractals Imply Chaos but doesn't this (1 + Matrix) Creates Chaos from it...kind of looks like molecular doesn't it?
http://<br /> <a href="http://ashesm...20Base.png</a>

Please visit the UPDATED and Easier to understand Website, sorry if the description was so poor in the past.
http://<br /> <a href="http://ashesm...binary.php</a>
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September 23rd, 2013, 05:56 PM   #16
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Re: Can we add infinite frequency bits simultaneously

Quote:
Originally Posted by Hedge
Not sure I see how it works for adding or subtraction, or how it solves any fundamental problems of computing.

I mean, if you put the frequency vibration for 4 and 5 on top of each other, the interference between them falls on points that fit a frequency of 20, I see that. But that's a multiplication.

Personally I think it is a fun way to think about numbers but probably not as amazing as it is seeming to you right now.
Thanks Hedge, I understand exactly what you mean. The numbers I believe are added in Paralell or in Series.

In Series they are as Long as their are Frequency Bits combined. So 2 Frequency Bit's and Each Frequency Bit is 1 Second Long, they the Answer in Series is 2 Seconds
In Parallel they are Louder as they are all squished in the same Space. 2 Frequency Bits are 1 Second, Louder and Faster?

I have Really Updated the site since I was here Last, Please check it out for Better Understanding... http://ashesmi.yolasite.com/fractal-binary.php

Thanks Hedge
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