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May 4th, 2018, 08:20 AM   #1
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I'm looking for someone who can "introduce" me to the arXiv.org site, so I can upload a paper that demonstrates my elegant formula for the Harmonic Numbers of order k.

Because I no longer have a university email, and haven't published in my undergrad years, there's this little obstacle that you have to be "presented" to the site in order so you can upload a research in there. I'm willing to give a little preview of what my resulting formula is if someone volunteers to do me this favor.

I'm not looking for peer-review though, this theme is not very abstract and it's easy to know whether it's right or wrong, though I recognize my proof might contain holes or not be impeccable.

I have written to former university professors, but none have used the arXiv (.) One that has used I barely knew, so he felt little motivation to help me (professors can be a-oles). Another one, a bright mathematician called Odilon Otavio, was keen to help, but has never used either.

My formula yields ζ(k) when n → ∞ and must have other interesting applications\implications.

Last edited by skipjack; May 4th, 2018 at 12:14 PM.
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May 4th, 2018, 12:57 PM   #2
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How do you know your formula is new?
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May 5th, 2018, 09:01 AM   #3
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I know because I did extensive research online, there's only an asymptotic formula, and it's only for H_{1}(n) anyway.
Are we able to post LaTex equations on here?

Well, if I can't find anybody on here, I have the arXiv itself as a last resort.

Last edited by jrsousa2; May 5th, 2018 at 09:10 AM.
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May 5th, 2018, 09:04 AM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jrsousa2 View Post
How do you know that I don't know?
He never said you don't know. He asked how you knew.

If your formula is new, it belongs in a journal. ArXiv is just a preprint server, it means nothing. Nobody will look at your work if it's on ArXiv. You need to publish it, like all mathematicians eventually publish their research in a journal.
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May 5th, 2018, 10:41 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Micrm@ss View Post
He never said you don't know. He asked how you knew.

If your formula is new, it belongs in a journal. ArXiv is just a preprint server, it means nothing. Nobody will look at your work if it's on ArXiv. You need to publish it, like all mathematicians eventually publish their research in a journal.
I agree with you as far as ArXiv, but I have heard they do peer review. I suspect this would be valuable to jrsousa2 as he seems reticent about posting his work. (Or perhaps that's why he's asking about LaTeX.)

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May 6th, 2018, 07:49 AM   #6
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I know it belongs in a journal, and will try that too.
However, not being an academic, and with so many pros vying for the spots on journals, my chances of making it into a journal are slim at best.
I will still try them though, it can't hurt to try right?

But I will try and use the arXiv as a way to secure the credit first, after all, at times something doesn't exist, but when you release a finding, everybody starts to claim that it exists or they themselves done it before Lol.

Gregori Perelman only released his work as pre-print, if it's hard for him, let alone for me. Or maybe he's just averse to the whole establishment thing.

I just found, after restless searches, that there is a formula for harmonics, but it's unnatural, cumbersome, and not very insightful. It uses the derivatives of the log of the Gamma function.

My formula is more elegant, more natural and arises from the right way to approach the problem, I believe.
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May 6th, 2018, 07:50 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Micrm@ss View Post
He never said you don't know. He asked how you knew.

If your formula is new, it belongs in a journal. ArXiv is just a preprint server, it means nothing. Nobody will look at your work if it's on ArXiv. You need to publish it, like all mathematicians eventually publish their research in a journal.
What journals might I try? I already know about the AMS and MAA.
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May 6th, 2018, 08:47 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jrsousa2 View Post
I know it belongs in a journal, and will try that too.
However, not being an academic, and with so many pros vying for the spots on journals, my chances of making it into a journal are slim at best.
That is not true. There are enough of open spots in journals. If your work has merit, it will be accepted.

The thing is, if you publish it on Arxiv it might actually harm your chances later. Since not all journals will be ok with the work being on arxiv.

Quote:
But I will try and use the arXiv as a way to secure the credit first
If you send it to a journal, they'll keep a copy of when you have sent it to them. That way, you'll be able to prove you were first. Hell, you can just watermark your paper using google or anything.

Quote:
Gregori Perelman only released his work as pre-print, if it's hard for him, let alone for me. Or maybe he's just averse to the whole establishment thing.
It's not hard for him. He would have been accepted in any journal he chose. He chose not to send it to journals for other reasons.
Thing is, Perelman was already very famous. People were going to look at his work whatever happened, cause he was famous. It didn't matter for him to publish in a journal or Arxiv. For a newcomer, it does matter. Nobody will look at your work in arxiv.
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May 6th, 2018, 09:09 AM   #9
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If I could like a post, I would.
Know what, yesterday I worked hard on the references for my paper, so, yes, I will definitely try a journal.

Another con of journals is that they don't like that we submit a paper to more than one journal, to increase our chances.

Right now I have to try and see if my approach allows me to infer if Catalan's constant can be known, that'd make my paper all the cooler.
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May 6th, 2018, 09:40 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jrsousa2 View Post
If I could like a post, I would.
Know what, yesterday I worked hard on the references for my paper, so, yes, I will definitely try a journal.

Another con of journals is that they don't like that we submit a paper to more than one journal, to increase our chances.

Right now I have to try and see if my approach allows me to infer if Catalan's constant can be known, that'd make my paper all the cooler.
The "thanks" button is just above the three blue buttons in the lower right corner. Move your cursor just above the buttons and it will appear.

For LaTeX: We wrap the stuff in math tags or using $ tags. We have subforum for learning to code it. It's fairly simple for most equations you want to type.

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