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March 21st, 2017, 11:28 PM   #1
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Proof to Collatz conjecture.

Hey guys.. I have the proof to the Conjecture. Is it safe to submit it here? I have had it since 2012 but have trust issues. Also I am quite sure about it.
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March 21st, 2017, 11:29 PM   #2
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Do you have trust issues, or are you sure about it?
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March 21st, 2017, 11:36 PM   #3
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Hey guys.. I have the proof to the Conjecture. Is it safe to submit it here? I have had it since 2012 but have trust issues. Also I am quite sure about it.
wouldn't you rather submit it to the folks who will pay a million dollars for it?
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March 22nd, 2017, 12:50 AM   #4
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Any information posted on the open Forum is public accessible. So the best you could do is PM the proof to someone you feel you can trust. And please ask the member in question if they are willing; don't just PM the proof to someone.

-Dan
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March 22nd, 2017, 02:50 AM   #5
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If you look at history there have been many disputes about who discovered what and when. Your trust issues are well founded in my humble opinion.
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March 22nd, 2017, 03:49 AM   #6
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If you look at history there have been many disputes about who discovered what and when. Your trust issues are well founded in my humble opinion.
Yeah, Physics can get pretty cutthroat as well.

-Dan
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March 22nd, 2017, 06:11 PM   #7
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Yeah, Physics can get pretty cutthroat as well.

-Dan
You know what makes me laugh? Experts that say people 'independently' discovered the same thing. We hear that a lot in the math and sciences. There's a lot of politics involved I think which is quite distasteful.


Last edited by skipjack; March 22nd, 2017 at 06:21 PM.
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March 22nd, 2017, 06:53 PM   #8
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If it wasn't for money and other societal shenanigans, we could all be more like Gauss.

The question is not who discovered something, it's what is discovered. And if you are the 'who', then you'd be happy with your discovery but not concerned about reputation and money and all those nasty things..
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March 22nd, 2017, 08:15 PM   #9
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If it wasn't for money and other societal shenanigans, we could all be more like Gauss.

The question is not who discovered something, it's what is discovered. And if you are the 'who', then you'd be happy with your discovery but not concerned about reputation and money and all those nasty things..
in math yes, in physics no, although with serious computer power becoming more important in pure mathematics this might not be true for much longer.

Physics is at the point where you need an LHC (or larger!) to make progress in certain areas. Math for the most part can still advance using lots of pencils and lots of paper.
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March 22nd, 2017, 08:18 PM   #10
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in math yes, in physics no, although with serious computer power becoming more important in pure mathematics this might not be true for much longer.

Physics is at the point where you need an LHC (or larger!) to make progress in certain areas. Math for the most part can still advance using lots of pencils and lots of paper.
I was more referring to personal gain.

But yes that is true. I agree. Indeed it is those 'nasty things' I referred to that allows us to progress in those areas. A symbiotic relationship of sorts.

Last edited by skipjack; April 1st, 2017 at 09:50 AM.
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