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December 24th, 2016, 05:27 AM   #1
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Question Near impossible to solve, mathematical pattern

This is the mathematical pattern we are trying to complete: https://www.reddit.com/r/codes/comme...low_a_pattern/

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120 - 1,2,3,4,5,6,8,10,12,15,20,24,30,40,60,120 okay so those are the 16 divisors of 120, I'm betting the 3rd code is an even composite number as well, just like 120. It is composed of four distinct prime numbers multiplied together. it has a total of sixteen divisors. So we are looking for 16 divisors of a large number and we need something like this 7 × 181 × 508 but that is only an example of three distinct prime numbers, we need 4 that multiple into a large number in the thousands.

From my understanding, that is my perspective above.

I don't want anyone to solve this for me, but leading me in the right direction or giving me an equation would help.

Last edited by skipjack; December 24th, 2016 at 08:17 AM.
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December 24th, 2016, 05:56 AM   #2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by astronomical View Post
7 × 181 × 508 but that is only an example of three distinct prime numbers
I'm not sure what you are doing but here is a nudge in the right direction ... 508 is not a prime number.
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December 24th, 2016, 06:07 AM   #3
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I'm not sure what you are doing but here is a nudge in the right direction ... 508 is not a prime number.
I know, I was stating that I need prime numbers to solve for the solution. Do you have any idea how I'd solve this? Or what type of math it is?

Last edited by skipjack; December 24th, 2016 at 08:19 AM.
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December 24th, 2016, 06:16 AM   #4
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I would get a decent source of information. There is no hint of how the first two codes were found, so you really have next to nothing.
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December 24th, 2016, 06:28 AM   #5
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I would get a decent source of information. There is no hint of how the first two codes were found, so you really have next to nothing.
so there is no possible way to solve it?
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December 24th, 2016, 07:20 AM   #6
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really need a jumpstart to solve this.
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December 24th, 2016, 07:49 AM   #7
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I would be very surprised if your analysis in the Reddit post is relevant.

I'd have thought that the game would provide clues
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December 24th, 2016, 08:22 AM   #8
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Very often mathematicians find sequences and wish to know the pattern. There is a large database of integer sequences maintained for precisely this reason. Your sequence can be found here.

1,2,3,4,5,6,8,10,12,15,20,24,30,40,60,120 - OEIS

The usefulness is that once you get several candidates for the next few integers or even better, a closed form, you can try to understand the sequence in the context of its origin for your problem. Often sequences can be understood in many different contexts and Richard Stanley famously included a section of exercises in his book which derived the Catalan numbers as the solution to over 50 seemingly distinct problems.
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December 24th, 2016, 08:47 AM   #9
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Originally Posted by SDK View Post
Very often mathematicians find sequences and wish to know the pattern. There is a large database of integer sequences maintained for precisely this reason. Your sequence can be found here.

1,2,3,4,5,6,8,10,12,15,20,24,30,40,60,120 - OEIS

The usefulness is that once you get several candidates for the next few integers or even better, a closed form, you can try to understand the sequence in the context of its origin for your problem. Often sequences can be understood in many different contexts and Richard Stanley famously included a section of exercises in his book which derived the Catalan numbers as the solution to over 50 seemingly distinct problems.
Alright, thanks! Would this problem coincide with "nearly impossible" ?
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