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January 13th, 2011, 01:24 PM   #11
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Re: Primes in sequence

It is obvious that for n and p fixed you have a bound.
You do not need to prove it.
It is not easy to know it before testing it.
For some values (n <= 7 )the cycle is very short.
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January 13th, 2011, 02:14 PM   #12
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Re: Primes in sequence

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bogauss
It is obvious that for n and p fixed you have a bound.
You do not need to prove it.
What, then, did you mean when you wrote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bogauss
(infinite sequence for example)
in the original post?
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January 13th, 2011, 03:33 PM   #13
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Re: Primes in sequence

I was just asking a question. I did not claim that it exist an infinite sequence.
It is obvious that the number of prime in sequence depends on the value of n.
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