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April 7th, 2014, 09:29 AM   #21
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I actually showed you that method.
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April 8th, 2014, 02:39 AM   #22
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I remember you didn't show me the method I was looking for because none of your methods have $\displaystyle 5×11=55$
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April 8th, 2014, 03:01 AM   #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by XPMai View Post
I remember you didn't show me the method I was looking for because none of your methods have $\displaystyle 5×11=55$
Quote:
Originally Posted by MarkFL View Post
What is the state method? If you are going to do sums, then you need to know these formulas eventually.

edit:

You could state:

1 + 2 + 3 + 4 + 5 + 6 + 7 + 8 + 9 + 10 =

(1 + 10) + (2 + 9) + (3 + + (4 + 7) + (5 + 6) =

5(11) = 55

But this would be tedious if you had the first 1000 natural numbers.
Hmmm...5 times 11.
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April 8th, 2014, 03:58 AM   #24
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Hello MarkFL,

Oh, although your method mentioned $\displaystyle 5×11=55$ but you were not specific.

You only show me long addiction but did not explain clearly like me and also did not explain how did you get $\displaystyle 5$.

In addiction, you did not say $\displaystyle 5×11=55$, you said 5(11)=55

Mai

Quote:
Originally Posted by MarkFL View Post
What is the state method? If you are going to do sums, then you need to know these formulas eventually.

edit:

You could state:

$\displaystyle 1 + 2 + 3 + 4 + 5 + 6 + 7 + 8 + 9 + 10 =$

$\displaystyle (1+10) + (2+9) + (3+ + (4+7) + (5+6) =$

$\displaystyle 5(11) = 55$

But this would be tedious if you had the first 1000 natural numbers.
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April 8th, 2014, 04:06 AM   #25
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Originally Posted by XPMai View Post
Hello MarkFL,

Oh, although your method mentioned $\displaystyle 5×11=55$ but you were not specific.

You only show me long addiction but did not explain clearly like me and also did not explain how did you get $\displaystyle 5$.

In addiction, you did not say $\displaystyle 5×11=55$, you said 5(11)=55

Mai
I was not specific? I specifically and clearly showed you several ways to add these numbers. You're welcome.
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April 8th, 2014, 12:03 PM   #26
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...the method I was looking for...
Say there are m methods: how would anybody know which one
you're looking for? Your statement makes no sense.
Are you sure you're from "earth"
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April 8th, 2014, 12:14 PM   #27
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I have two other methods for deriving the summation formula for arithmetic progressions involving linear difference equations, but something tells me "these aren't the 'droids you're looking for."
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April 10th, 2014, 03:17 AM   #28
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Hello,

I was too busy wasn't have time to respond.

Quote:
Originally Posted by MarkFL View Post
I was not specific? I specifically and clearly showed you several ways to add these numbers. You're welcome.
You didn't tell me how you got $\displaystyle 5$, actually $\displaystyle 10÷2=5$.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Denis View Post
Say there are m methods: how would anybody know which one
you're looking for? Your statement makes no sense.
Are you sure you're from "earth"
I know there're many methods, but I stated that I need Primary School method but you given me "formula" button which isn't Primary School, right?

Yes, I am from earth, a living thing on earth.

Quote:
Originally Posted by MarkFL View Post
I have two other methods for deriving the summation formula for arithmetic progressions involving linear difference equations, but something tells me "these aren't the 'droids you're looking for."
Yes, first I forgot to mention Primary School method because I thought there are a few that's why you given me formula method. After that you given me normal method but difficult to understand because many unknown numbers,
Like $\displaystyle 7=2×4-1$, there are many possibilities like $\displaystyle 7=2×3+1$.
And not all numbers that method can work, you said need to do formula method.

Mai
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April 10th, 2014, 05:38 AM   #29
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Quote:
Originally Posted by XPMai View Post
I know there're many methods, but I stated that I need Primary School method but you given me "formula" button which isn't Primary School, right?
I don't know. I discovered that formula in 2nd grade (~8 years old) and only learned about the one you mentioned many years later. Of course I didn't express it as elegantly as Mark, but what do you expect?
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April 10th, 2014, 05:58 AM   #30
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You learnt formula at $\displaystyle 8$ years old? Unbelievable! (Y)
Your Maths should be very good.
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