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February 4th, 2019, 12:40 PM   #1
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Counting real numbers

To count the real numbers in [.1,1), remove the decimal point.
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February 4th, 2019, 12:53 PM   #2
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What is [.1,1) after you take away the decimal point? [1, 1) makes no sense!

Again with the counting? What exactly are you getting out of this? You know that no one is going to agree with your arguments as they haven't for the last, what, 10 or so threads?

-Dan
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February 4th, 2019, 12:57 PM   #3
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I tried it, but most of them went away, saying that counting them would be pointless.
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February 4th, 2019, 01:16 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by topsquark View Post
What is [.1,1) after you take away the decimal point? [1, 1) makes no sense!
-Dan
The question makes no sense.

[.1,1) is an interval of real numbers.

.1 -> 1
.105 -> 105
.13 -> 13
.333 -> 333

Every real number in the INTERVAL [.1,1) maps to a unique natural number.

I'm trying to make it as simple as possible.
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February 4th, 2019, 01:24 PM   #5
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That doesn't help you count them.
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February 4th, 2019, 02:43 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by zylo View Post
To count the real numbers in [.1,1), remove the decimal point.
I favor free speech but I do not support multiple top posts on the same tedious confusions already being discussed to elsewhere ad nauseum.
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February 4th, 2019, 02:50 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by zylo View Post
The question makes no sense.

[.1,1) is an interval of real numbers.

.1 -> 1
.105 -> 105
.13 -> 13
.333 -> 333

Every real number in the INTERVAL [.1,1) maps to a unique natural number.

I'm trying to make it as simple as possible.
Quote:
Originally Posted by zylo View Post
To count the real numbers in [.1,1), remove the decimal point.
I was referring to the comment in the OP that says "remove the decimal point." I don't understand that part. Are you saying something like "We have 0.623 in [.1, 1) so we will talk about 623?"

-Dan
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February 4th, 2019, 03:44 PM   #8
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That must be what zylo meant, but removing those decimal points doesn't help one count the numbers or prove that they can be counted.
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February 4th, 2019, 04:10 PM   #9
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Originally Posted by zylo View Post
To count the real numbers in [.1,1), remove the decimal point.
Monumental stupidity.
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February 4th, 2019, 04:48 PM   #10
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Your example of four numbers above conveniently does not include any reals with an infinite number of (non-zero trailing) digits. There are such reals, but none maps to any integer.
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