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January 13th, 2013, 05:16 AM   #1
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Reading and writing "structured" proofs: software request.

I'm looking for software in which to read and write proofs. The idea is somewhat similar to Leslie Lamport's "Structured Proofs."

You have a highest level of the document, which is a sequence of definitions and theorems. You can click on a theorem to see a proof, which is itself a sequence of statements. Within this proof, you can click a statement to see a justification; which is again a sequence of statements. This process should continue as far as necessary. Rather than being hyperlinks that take you to a new page, I'd like the clicked-upon statement and all the statements that come after it to "move down" in order to make space for the justification being sought.

Does anyone know of software that does this, or could easily be made to do this?
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January 13th, 2013, 11:49 AM   #2
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Re: Reading and writing "structured" proofs: software reques

Well, you could look at Metamath which does something similar.
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January 21st, 2013, 11:41 PM   #3
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Re: Reading and writing "structured" proofs: software reques

The mathematical community has agreed upon a number of more-or-less standard conventions for proofwriting. On the whole, these recommendations represent a consensus among the best mathematical writers. Although most of these guidelines are stated as hard and fast rules, every rule admits exceptions, and experienced mathematical writers might encounter situations that call for different choices. Some of the guidelines that have to be followed are Identifying the Audience, Writing in paragraph form, Using proper English, Writing clearly, Including motivation and many others.
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January 22nd, 2013, 05:53 AM   #4
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Re: Reading and writing "structured" proofs: software reques

That's a quote, right? Please give attribution!
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January 24th, 2013, 02:01 AM   #5
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Re: Reading and writing "structured" proofs: softw

It is the true information
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January 25th, 2013, 08:06 AM   #6
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What johnykeets posted may have been based on this article.
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February 1st, 2013, 10:24 AM   #7
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Re: Reading and writing "structured" proofs: software reques

Dear johnykeets,

You're very presumptuous, and more than a little smug.

You write:
Quote:
The mathematical community has agreed upon a number of more-or-less standard conventions for proofwriting. On the whole, these recommendations represent a consensus among the best mathematical writers.
It's interesting you mention this. I happen to be a student of mathematical writing, in the sense that I study mathematical works deemed exceptional in their clarity. I own an entire collection of the best, clearest, and most articulate works of the best mathematical writers.

Let me ask you a question. How do you think those writers got where they are today?

Do you think they rose to prominence by blind adherence to "consensus opinion," or fictitious "agreements" that never happened? Of course not. Mediocre minds trust the "consensus," but great intellects are more sceptical.

Now. As a free man, you're entitled to choose whose works you read, and whose you forgo. And, as a free man, and an explorer, and a non-conformist, and everything else women love, I'll continue proofwriting in whatever format I damn well please. Maybe one day, the set of all the best mathematical writers will incorporate me. ("Incorporate" being a word I reserve for membership, while "include" I use for the superset relation.)

Now since you're a newcomer to these forums, I'm going to cut you some slack. Don't get smug with me again, Johnny.
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February 1st, 2013, 11:22 AM   #8
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Re: Reading and writing "structured" proofs: software reques

(Note that you're essentially arguing with an extract from the John Lee article, not Johnny Keets.)
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February 4th, 2013, 12:22 AM   #9
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Re: Reading and writing "structured" proofs: software reques

To be honest, looking back I feel like I overreacted. If you're reading this johnny, I hope you'll accept my apologies for taking things too seriously. I'm sure we both have better things to do than have an argument over this.
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