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July 2nd, 2017, 02:37 PM   #11
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The mathematicians decided that a circle is a mathematical subject.
Not only mathematicians, but physicists and other scientists and engineers and well everybody else.

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But this is not true, a circle is a physical issue.
Since you disagree you need to explain exactly what you mean and why before you can go any further.

What if you are wrong?
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July 2nd, 2017, 02:55 PM   #12
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Mmm.. pie.
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July 2nd, 2017, 03:08 PM   #13
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I'm really sure this idea

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Not only mathematicians, but physicists and other scientists and engineers and well everybody else.



Since you disagree you need to explain exactly what you mean and why before you can go any further.

What if you are wrong?
The Pythagorean theorem opened the geometric gate to mathematics.
In the Pythagoras theorem there appear straight line segments.
Therefore, mathematics does not know how to handle round lines.
Thank you for your interest
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July 2nd, 2017, 03:13 PM   #14
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I know it sounds strange and hallucinatory, but ....

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Originally Posted by v8archie View Post
Mmm.. pie.
I know it sounds strange and hallucinatory, but it's the truth.
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July 2nd, 2017, 03:15 PM   #15
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The Pythagorean theorem opened the geometric gate to mathematics.
In the Pythagoras theorem there appear straight line segments.
Therefore, mathematics does not know how to handle round lines.
Thank you for your interest
This has nothing to do with Pythagoras.

No one can draw a perfect circle or a perfect straight line.
It is a physical impossibility to create either in the real world.
This is true for a variety of reasons.

Do you agree or disagree?
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July 2nd, 2017, 03:35 PM   #16
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Originally Posted by aetzbar View Post
I know it sounds strange and hallucinatory, but it's the truth.
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No it's not. You just want people to pay you some attention. If you had a tiny fraction of the knowledge required to support your claim, you'd realise just how much damage it would do to extremely well verified theories of physics.

As it is, you are simply demonstrating how little you understand the art of measurement, which sounds like the sort of thing that might put a big dent in your career.
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July 2nd, 2017, 03:41 PM   #17
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I'm agree....but

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Originally Posted by studiot View Post
This has nothing to do with Pythagoras.

No one can draw a perfect circle or a perfect straight line.
It is a physical impossibility to create either in the real world.
This is true for a variety of reasons.

Do you agree or disagree?
Today's technology can produce a very precise steel cylinder.
This is not a perfect cylinder, but it gives you the opportunity to discover the idea of changing pi.
Therefore, even in perfect circles will appear the idea of changing pi
Mathematics can not achieve such a result.
Mathematics does not know how to handle round lines.
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July 2nd, 2017, 03:54 PM   #18
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Originally Posted by aetzbar View Post
Today's technology can produce a very precise steel cylinder.
This is not a perfect cylinder, but it gives you the opportunity to discover the idea of changing pi.
Therefore, even in perfect circles will appear the idea of changing pi
Mathematics can not achieve such a result.
Mathematics does not know how to handle round lines.
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If you are saying that any two drawn circles have a different circumference and diameter ratio you are right. A (physically) drawn circle has some uncertainty in the width of the arcs, width of the drawing implement, etc. However you are ignoring the fact that when we discuss the properties of a circle we are talking about a perfect circle...the locus of points that are equidistant from a point we call the center of the circle. This is the value of pi that we are talking about.

There really is no point in talking about the uncertainties of a physically drawn circle in terms of a theoretical ratio. If it helps you understand the theoretical nature of we have several varieties of equations to choose from that aren't physical but produce the same answers. Here's one of my favorites:


This can be shown to be the same as we find in a circle.

-Dan
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July 2nd, 2017, 03:55 PM   #19
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I know that the changing pi idea is a revolution

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Originally Posted by v8archie View Post
No it's not. You just want people to pay you some attention. If you had a tiny fraction of the knowledge required to support your claim, you'd realise just how much damage it would do to extremely well verified theories of physics.

As it is, you are simply demonstrating how little you understand the art of measurement, which sounds like the sort of thing that might put a big dent in your career.
I know that the changing pi idea is a revolution.
Geometry has been waiting for 2000 years, for this revolution
This idea belongs to the realm of tiny phenomena.
The great accelerator in Geneva is also investigating a tiny phenomenon.
Today's technology is able to detect the changing pi phenomenon.
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July 2nd, 2017, 04:33 PM   #20
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I know that the changing pi idea is a revolution.
Geometry has been waiting for 2000 years, for this revolution
This isn't a discussion about a revolution. It is a discussion of what you want to think is going on. Try learning more about "tiny phenomena" before you post again.

-Dan
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