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February 27th, 2018, 01:31 PM   #1
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Right Tangle

Have you ever seen a game like mine, Right Tangle? Is it challenging and diverse yet not tedious?

1. The play is on an 8 x 8 checkerboard

2. Fill the opposing first rows with black versus white markers

3. The initial move is decided by "random" choice

4. Players alternate, moving one marker one square per turn

5. Markers move horizontally, vertically or diagonally

6. No more than one marker may occupy a square

7. A player must move without a draw or lose

8. The first to fill the opponent's initial row with their own markers wins

-Loren
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March 8th, 2018, 08:02 PM   #2
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There's one problem I see and that's that a player can force a draw by moving one marker backwards and forwards. That way their opponent can never fill their row.
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March 8th, 2018, 09:51 PM   #3
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Originally Posted by Azzajazz View Post
There's one problem I see and that's that a player can force a draw by moving one marker backwards and forwards. That way their opponent can never fill their row.
Wouldn't rule #7 avoid that conundrum?
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March 8th, 2018, 11:05 PM   #4
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How do you avoid arguments as to who's move leads to a draw?
Aside from that, I believe Azz is incorrect, if you move 1 piece forward you can sneak through on the diagonal to the gap behind the piece, that tactic will lead to a lose (your opponent gains ground while you stagnate, they can then afford to waste a move to synchronise themselves with getting the diagonal bypass if required).
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March 9th, 2018, 10:11 AM   #5
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How do you avoid arguments as to who's move leads to a draw?
Aside from that, I believe Azz is incorrect, if you move 1 piece forward you can sneak through on the diagonal to the gap behind the piece, that tactic will lead to a lose (your opponent gains ground while you stagnate, they can then afford to waste a move to synchronise themselves with getting the diagonal bypass if required).
I think you're both right and thank you. I was never good at chess, either. "I resign."
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March 9th, 2018, 09:48 PM   #6
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Originally Posted by weirddave View Post
Aside from that, I believe Azz is incorrect, if you move 1 piece forward you can sneak through on the diagonal to the gap behind the piece, that tactic will lead to a lose (your opponent gains ground while you stagnate, they can then afford to waste a move to synchronise themselves with getting the diagonal bypass if required).
The win condition is to fill your opponents initial row. If only one of the pieces move off the initial row, then the other spaces cannot be filled. Sure you can occupy one square of the row, but not all of them.

Perhaps if your markers started on the second row and the goal was to fill the row furthest from you?
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March 10th, 2018, 01:52 AM   #7
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If you get behind their piece by slipping in through the diagonal, they can't move it back, so another choice must be made. I have spotted a flaw in my thinking since the 'defender' doesn't have to move the same piece back and forth every time, it would be interesting to try it on a board to see if it is possible to force the defender to leave a vulnerable diagonal, I think it is but can't prove it.
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March 10th, 2018, 04:01 PM   #8
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Ok. Let me rephrase my argument. You can force a draw by only moving the same marker every turn. It actually doesn't matter where you move it and you're always guaranteed to have a legal move with that marker.
(Unless your opponent uses all 8 of their markers to surround your marker. In this case just make sure you move the marker near their side of the board so that none of their markers are in a position to occupy a space in your row.)
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March 10th, 2018, 04:26 PM   #9
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Originally Posted by Azzajazz View Post
There's one problem I see and that's that a player can force a draw by moving one marker backwards and forwards. That way their opponent can never fill their row.
You can force a draw in chess too, and I think that game would count as challenging and diverse and yet not tedious.

I suspect that the game would be similar to checkers/draughts in complexity.
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March 10th, 2018, 04:47 PM   #10
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You can force a draw in chess too.
No you can't. The difference is that here the draw is forced no matter what your opponent does. In chess, your opponent can fight against a draw.

For example, suppose that you enter a game of chess saying "Oh I'll just move my knight back and forth and then it'll be a draw." Imagine your surprise when you get four move checkmated.
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