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May 5th, 2017, 08:24 PM   #11
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Originally Posted by Monox D. I-Fly View Post
So the "true" answer is -1 degrees Celsius?
In this case, truth is in the eye of the person who wrote the question.

Last edited by skipjack; May 6th, 2017 at 05:17 AM.
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May 6th, 2017, 12:03 AM   #12
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in this case truth is in the eye of the person who wrote the question.
I've checked, and found new paradoxes:
Should we multiply that 273 in Kelvin and that 32 in Fahrenheit with 4?
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May 6th, 2017, 05:05 AM   #13
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Temperature is a measure of energy. A conceptually "correct" scale should equate the meaurement to the magnitude of the energy. Scales not having zero at 0 Kelvin don't do this.
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May 7th, 2017, 06:34 PM   #14
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So, it's 803.45 degrees Celcius?
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May 7th, 2017, 09:33 PM   #15
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That's my opinion, yes.
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May 7th, 2017, 09:41 PM   #16
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Hey Mr.Fly, why don't you move here:
How Hot is Mercury?
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May 7th, 2017, 11:15 PM   #17
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the thing is you could make some other temperature scale, just as valid, with smaller increments. Then "4 times" as hot would result in a smaller absolute temperature difference.

So the question isn't really meaningful.
You could, but you'd end up with the same answer but for that scale, using kelvin to calculate is correct because you have absolute zero and temperature is linear, all other temperature scales (unless you design log ones) will be some multiplication and offset from that. I don't think I've explained that very well, can someone help?
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May 7th, 2017, 11:38 PM   #18
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Originally Posted by weirddave View Post
You could, but you'd end up with the same answer but for that scale, using kelvin to calculate is correct because you have absolute zero and temperature is linear, all other temperature scales (unless you design log ones) will be some multiplication and offset from that. I don't think I've explained that very well, can someone help?
assuming a scale that had 0 at 0 kelvin you wouldn't need to convert to kelvin to do the computation.

This is what Archie mentioned a few posts back.
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May 8th, 2017, 04:08 AM   #19
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The temperatures are akin to vectors in the sense that -4 is a vector in the negative x direction with a magnitude of 4. With that, 4 times hotter than -4 is 12 degrees C.
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May 8th, 2017, 04:59 AM   #20
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So 100 times colder than $0^\circ C$ is $0^\circ C$? I don't buy it.
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