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April 20th, 2017, 05:00 AM   #1
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Interesting finding about pi and scientific constants

Dear all,

I explored the value of pi up to 10 million digits with the following link

Pi - 10 Million Digits @ http://Pi.Karmona.com

From here, I realized that it included many scientific constants. Below are some examples

• …1618033…
Where
1.618033 ~ golden ratio to be used in design, painting, and architecture etc.
(Source: Wolfram MathWorld: The Web's Most Extensive Mathematics Resource)
• …271828…
Where
2.71828 ~ Euler’s number
(Source: Wolfram MathWorld: The Web's Most Extensive Mathematics Resource)
• …667408…
Where
6.67408 ~ constant of gravitation
(Source: http://physics.nist.gov)
• …8987…
Where 8.987 ~ Coulomb constant in electrostatic
(Source: Eric Weisstein's World of Physics)
• …885418…
Where 8.85418 ~ electric constant (Or Vacuum permittivity)
(Source: http://physics.nist.gov)
• …6626070…
Where 6.626070 ~ Planck constant
(Source: http://physics.nist.gov)
• …16021766…
Where 1.6021766 ~ elementary charge (Charge of electron)
(Source: http://physics.nist.gov)
• …9109383…
Where 9.109383 ~ electron mass
(Source: http://physics.nist.gov)
• …980665…
Where 9.80665 ~ acceleration of gravity
(Source: http://physics.nist.gov)
• …602214085…
Where 6.02214085 ~ Avogadro constant
(Source: http://physics.nist.gov)
• …1380648…
Where 1.380648 ~ Boltzmann constant
(Source: http://physics.nist.gov)
• …167262…
Where 1.67262 ~ Proton mass
(Source: http://physics.nist.gov)

And maybe there are more cases. I wonder whether this interesting finding is only accidental, or there is any implicit rule here.

Any feedback or discussion can be sent to theodorenghiem@yahoo.co.nz
It’s nice if you can share my article in social media for more opinions

Thinh Nghiem

Last edited by skipjack; April 21st, 2017 at 05:23 AM.
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April 20th, 2017, 05:20 AM   #2
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You didn't find your ddmmyyyy birth date?!
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April 20th, 2017, 10:29 AM   #3
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if you reduce those constants to the first 8 or so digits, then of course you can find those small strings of digits within the infinite digits of pi.

What you can't do, is find their actual infinite digit representation as a substring of the digits of pi.
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Last edited by skipjack; April 21st, 2017 at 05:25 AM.
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April 20th, 2017, 12:58 PM   #4
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Go to this site:

http://www.angio.net/pi/piquery

I typed in today's date April 20, 2017 as 04202017.

It came back that this string of digits 04202017 first appears at the 62,881,977th place after the decimal point in pi and that this string occurs twice in the first 200 million digits of pi.

A dyslexic friend typed this string 49913913 into the site and thought he saw applepie.
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April 21st, 2017, 04:15 AM   #5
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Originally, I also had the same thinking like yours by considering it as coincidence. However, I replaced pi with another irrational number,
such as Euler number or golden ratio, and replicated all above testing.
This time, these values above could not be found with up to 5 or 6 digits like the result with pi.
So I declare that this is pi's secret that needs to be investigated more.

Last edited by skipjack; April 21st, 2017 at 05:26 AM.
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April 21st, 2017, 05:56 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thinhnghiem View Post
Originally, I also had the same thinking like yours by considering it as coincidence. However, I replaced pi with another irrational number,
such as Euler number or golden ratio, and replicated all above testing.
This time, these values above could not be found with up to 5 or 6 digits like the result with pi.
So I declare that this is pi's secret that needs to be investigated more.
Irrational numbers don't quite have the property of being random, but there is really no surprise. Consider Shakespeare's monkeys.

-Dan
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April 21st, 2017, 06:37 AM   #7
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Finding particular 6-digit sequences amongst 10 million is hardly surprising, as one would find some amongst just one million. Using 2 million digits of e, I found 161803, 141592 (twice), 898755, 885418 (3 times), 662607 (twice), 160217, MMDDYY (my date of birth), 602214 (3 times), 160217, 13806 (15 times) and 861733 (twice) (Boltzmann constant in two different units), etc. All but two of your examples were limited to 6 or 7 digits.
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April 21st, 2017, 06:39 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by topsquark View Post
Irrational numbers don't quite have the property of being random, but there is really no surprise. Consider Shakespeare's monkeys.
That Wiki article is incorrect. A monkey, or at least a primate, did type out the complete works of Shakespeare within a 50 year lifetime after only a few billion years of evolution on earth, far less time than the age of the universe. It's surprising how this obvious point is missed by almost everyone who discusses this topic.
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April 21st, 2017, 06:48 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Maschke View Post
A monkey, or at least a primate, did type out the complete works of Shakespeare
Really? I suppose it's possible, but only by copying.
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April 21st, 2017, 09:05 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Maschke View Post
That Wiki article is incorrect. A monkey, or at least a primate, did type out the complete works of Shakespeare within a 50 year lifetime after only a few billion years of evolution on earth, far less time than the age of the universe. It's surprising how this obvious point is missed by almost everyone who discusses this topic.
YESSSSS.....
Wish you nonMASCHKEist would quit picking on my
great^n grandfather, where n = quite a few generations ago...
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