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July 6th, 2016, 10:02 PM   #1
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Math Focus: Multiplication
Question Changing Percent to a Workable Form?

Ok so, there is this math example in a math book I borrowed from the library and it has this example that stumps both me and my Fiance. The following is the example they used.

33 1/3% means 33 1/3 x 1/100.

First change 33 1/3 to an improper fraction: 100/3.

So 33 1/3% = 100/3 x 1/100, or 1/3.

That makes no sense to either me or my boyfriend, we are totally lost.
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July 7th, 2016, 01:04 AM   #2
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I'm not a fan of that explanation. Let's try a slightly different approach, tell us which stage you get stuck on:

1) 33 1/3% means (33+1/3) /100
2) 33+1/3 is the same as improper fraction 100/3
3) So, 33 1/3% is (100/3) /100
4) (100/3) /100 is 100/300 is 1/3
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Last edited by weirddave; July 7th, 2016 at 01:04 AM. Reason: Typo
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July 7th, 2016, 01:58 AM   #3
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Your answer is correct.

This table might help also make sense of your result (and some others you might get):


$\displaystyle \begin{array}{ccc}
Fraction & Decimal & Percentage \\
\frac{1}{2} & 0.5 & 50\% \\
\frac{1}{3} & 0.\dot{3} & 33.\dot{3}\%\\
\frac{1}{4} & 0.25 & 25\% \\
\frac{1}{5} & 0.2 & 20\% \\
\frac{1}{6} & 0.1\dot{6} & 16.\dot{6}\% \\
\end{array}
$

Note that the dot means 'recurring', so $\displaystyle 0.\dot{3}$ means 0.333333333...

Note also that $\displaystyle 0.\dot{3}$ is the same as $\displaystyle \frac{1}{3}$, so some people write $\displaystyle 33.\dot{3} \%$ as $\displaystyle 33 \frac{1}{3} \%$
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Last edited by Benit13; July 7th, 2016 at 02:00 AM.
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July 7th, 2016, 06:00 PM   #4
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I will attempt to explain the first line.

"Per cent" means "Hundredths"
For example 3% means $\displaystyle \frac {3}{100}$

Thus $\displaystyle 33 \frac {1}{3}$% means $\displaystyle \frac {33\frac {1}{3}}{100}$

Or $\displaystyle 33 \frac {1}{3}$% means $\displaystyle 33 \frac {1}{3}$× $\displaystyle \frac {1}{100}$
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July 7th, 2016, 11:38 PM   #5
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Question Getting your replies to look like actual fractions.

Hey guys, I really want to know how you got your replies to have numbers that look like real fractions, as apposed to this: 33 1/3%. I would find that very useful in the future and would like to know how to twerk the html to look like that. Thanks in advance.
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July 8th, 2016, 06:40 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Angelwngs26 View Post
Hey guys, I really want to know how you got your replies to have numbers that look like real fractions, as apposed to this: 33 1/3%. I would find that very useful in the future and would like to know how to twerk the html to look like that. Thanks in advance.
Whenever you post, click on "Go Advanced", then click on the sigma icon to place tags in your post. They look like this:

[.MATH] [./MATH]

but without the dots. Then, between the tags, you can place LaTeX commands (pronounced "Lar-teck"). If you're not sure what LaTeX is, it's basically a really nice typesetting standard for writing professional looking journal articles. The commands it has for displaying mathematics are awesome.

For example, if you put this in the middle of those tags:

\frac{4}{5}

you get

$\displaystyle \frac{4}{5}$

It's capable of really groovy stuff! For example

f'(\theta) = \int_0^5\sin 2\theta \frac{12x^2 + \phi}{\sin\theta \cos\phi} d\theta

gives

$\displaystyle f'(\theta) = \int_0^5\sin 2\theta \frac{12x^2 + \phi}{\sin\theta \cos\phi} d\theta$
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Last edited by Benit13; July 8th, 2016 at 06:42 AM.
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July 8th, 2016, 09:03 AM   #7
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Question Huh?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Benit13 View Post
Whenever you post, click on "Go Advanced", then click on the sigma icon to place tags in your post. They look like this:

[.MATH] [./MATH]

but without the dots. Then, between the tags, you can place LaTeX commands (pronounced "Lar-teck"). If you're not sure what LaTeX is, it's basically a really nice typesetting standard for writing professional looking journal articles. The commands it has for displaying mathematics are awesome.

For example, if you put this in the middle of those tags:

\frac{4}{5}

you get

$\displaystyle \frac{4}{5}$

It's capable of really groovy stuff! For example

f'(\theta) = \int_0^5\sin 2\theta \frac{12x^2 + \phi}{\sin\theta \cos\phi} d\theta

gives

$\displaystyle f'(\theta) = \int_0^5\sin 2\theta \frac{12x^2 + \phi}{\sin\theta \cos\phi} d\theta$
Well, how do I know what to put? That last example looks like gibberish to me.
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July 8th, 2016, 11:39 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Angelwngs26 View Post
Well, how do I know what to put? That last example looks like gibberish to me.
Every operator starts with "\". "int" is short for "integral. "^" means "superscript", "_" means "subscript". "\int_a^b" gives $\displaystyle \int_a^b$.

"\sin" gives $\displaystyle \sin$. You could just use "sin" to get $\displaystyle sin$. But most people prefer the look of the first. For Greek letters, use the standard Anglicization preceded by "\". "\theta" gives $\displaystyle \theta$. "\sin 2\theta" gives $\displaystyle \sin 2\theta$.

Fractions are done by "\frac{a}{b}": $\displaystyle \frac{a}{b}$. "12x^2+ \phi" gives $\displaystyle 12x^2+ \phi$ and "\sin \theta \cos \theta" gives $\displaystyle \sin \theta \cos \theta$. So "\frac{12x^2+ \phi}{\sin\theta\cos\theta}" gives $\displaystyle \frac{12x^2+ \phi}{\sin\theta\cos\theta}$.

As before, "^" gives a super script: "\sin^2(\theta)" gives $\displaystyle \sin^2(\theta)$. And, finally, "d\theta" gives $\displaystyle d\theta$.
Of course, each of those is surrounded by "math" and "/math" inside [ ].

Putting these together, "\int_0^5 \sin 2\theta\frac{12x^2+ \phi}{\sin\theta \cos\phi} d\theta" gives $\displaystyle \int_0^5 \sin 2\theta\frac{12x^2+ \phi}{\sin\theta \cos\phi} d\theta$.

If your question is about the meaning of the mathematical formula, it doesn't have any! It was given only as a demonstration of the Latex formula.
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July 11th, 2016, 01:38 AM   #9
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Also, take a look at the mathematics section of this document. It has a lot of information regarding LaTeX

https://tobi.oetiker.ch/lshort/lshort.pdf
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July 16th, 2016, 08:07 PM   #10
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Question What about this math problem?

It says to convert it from a percent to a common fraction. I'm sorry I'm asking about the same type of help with the same type of problem but I didn't understand the explanations given with the first one.

37 1/2%

How do I get the common fraction for that. I'm really sorry guys, I have some learning disabilities.
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