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March 1st, 2016, 07:32 PM   #1
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temperature problem

Temperatures can vary widely in the American Midwest in spring. One day in Indianapolis, the temperature changes from 41 degrees Fahrenheit to 82 degrees Fahrenheit in 6 hours. Jeffrey said, "That means it's now twice as warm as it was this morning!" Is he correct? Explain. Would Jeffrey be able to say the same thing if the temperature were converted to Celsius? Explain.
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March 1st, 2016, 07:37 PM   #2
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Have you made any progress on the problem? Usually you post your working.
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March 1st, 2016, 08:11 PM   #3
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Originally Posted by Azzajazz View Post
Have you made any progress on the problem? Usually you post your working.
This is just a reasoning question. How can someone post his/her working in such a case? Maybe shunya can tell what he/she thinks.
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March 1st, 2016, 08:35 PM   #4
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Sure 82℉ is twice as far away from the arbitrary point 41℉, but what does that actually mean? Using absolute zero (total absence of energy in form of heat), your numbers actually mean something and doubling any temperature in Kelvin will be twice as warm. You can't say the same for any other (relative) scale like ℃ or ℉.

Just as October 10th is not more "octobery" than October 5th.
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March 2nd, 2016, 01:42 AM   #5
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Azzajazz & Prakhar

I actually don't know where to begin answering this question.

Well, to draw an analogy...

If a given line AB is 4 cm and another line CD is 8 cm, it is valid to say that CD is twice as long as AB.

Then I think Jeffrey is right in claiming it has become twice as warm.

Am I correct?
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March 2nd, 2016, 02:59 AM   #6
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Nice analogy! And it makes sense for the first part of the question.

Have you tried converting the given temperatures to Celsius yet?
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March 2nd, 2016, 04:43 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by shunya View Post
Temperatures can vary widely in the American Midwest in spring. One day in Indianapolis, the temperature changes from 41 degrees Fahrenheit to 82 degrees Fahrenheit in 6 hours. Jeffrey said, "That means it's now twice as warm as it was this morning!" Is he correct? Explain. Would Jeffrey be able to say the same thing if the temperature were converted to Celsius? Explain.
I think the question is testing you on the difference between interval and ratio variables. Fahrenheit and Celsius temperatures are both interval variables; it doesn't makes sense to say it's twice at hot. That only works for temperatures in Kevin, which is a ratio variable.
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March 2nd, 2016, 06:41 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 123qwerty View Post
I think the question is testing you on the difference between interval and ratio variables. Fahrenheit and Celsius temperatures are both interval variables; it doesn't makes sense to say it's twice at hot. That only works for temperatures in Kevin, which is a ratio variable.
Exactly. when measuring the temperature in Kelvin we have an absolute scale. At 0 degrees kelvin, no atoms are vibrating.

The centigrade scale measures from 0 - 100 (freezing - boiling point of water). The Celsius scale, is essentially the same as Centigrade, albeit can go below 0 and above 100.

Fahrenheit, the freezing point of water is 32 and boiling point is 212. This wiki article is quite good and shows the different conversions: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fahrenheit
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March 9th, 2016, 07:17 PM   #9
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i still find it hard to understand temperature problem that's why i cannot answer it sometimes.
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