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October 20th, 2015, 04:02 AM   #1
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How to phrase a debt equation mathematically

Hello everyone,

Let me start by saying I'm a database expert/analyst rather than a mathematician.

I'd really like to improve my understanding of mathematical notation and I have a real business problem I'm working on.

Our customers pay for a product with a fixed monthly DD amount that is estimated based on how much of that product we think they might use (gas or elec).

We bill them quarterly for what they actually use which can differ significantly from the estimate and the resulting credit or debit balance will depend on whether the fixed monthly DD covers the invoices or not.

So (change in balance over a time period) = (Payments over a time period) - (Invoices over a time period).

A positive result indicates a credit balance, a negative means the customer is in debt.

My question is, what would be the correct mathematical notation for this equation?

My sincere thanks for your assistance,

Phil from the UK
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