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March 15th, 2015, 10:27 AM   #1
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Question regarding temperature inside a building

I have spent 2 hours trying to answer this question to come to the conclusion that maybe not enough information is given in the question? Any help would be greatly appreciated. (Please see attachment).

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March 15th, 2015, 11:09 AM   #2
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I have deleted the second duplicate thread which was missing the attachment, and moved the original here.

If the outside temperature is $M(t)$ and the inside temperature is $T(t)$, then by Newton's Law of Cooling, we may write the following IVP from the information given in the problem for part a):

$\displaystyle \frac{dT}{dt}=k(-10-T)=-k(T+10)$ where $T(0)=20,\,T(1)=15$

The ODE in the IVP is separable. Can you first solve the ODE? Then we can use the given points on the temperature curve to determine the constant of integration and the constant $k$.
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March 15th, 2015, 01:00 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MarkFL View Post
I have deleted the second duplicate thread which was missing the attachment, and moved the original here.

If the outside temperature is $M(t)$ and the inside temperature is $T(t)$, then by Newton's Law of Cooling, we may write the following IVP from the information given in the problem for part a):

$\displaystyle \frac{dT}{dt}=k(-10-T)=-k(T+10)$ where $T(0)=20,\,T(1)=15$

The ODE in the IVP is separable. Can you first solve the ODE? Then we can use the given points on the temperature curve to determine the constant of integration and the constant $k$.
thank you Mark, Newtons law of cooling went straight over my head when trying to answer this question, i can now do this by myself, thank you and i woud be grateful if you could look at my other thread
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