My Math Forum  

Go Back   My Math Forum > College Math Forum > Differential Equations

Differential Equations Ordinary and Partial Differential Equations Math Forum


Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
November 22nd, 2016, 04:06 PM   #1
Newbie
 
Joined: Nov 2016
From: Finland

Posts: 2
Thanks: 0

Help read wave

Help read the graph, the formula model is in the picture.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg wave.jpg (20.3 KB, 11 views)
animez is offline  
 
November 22nd, 2016, 06:03 PM   #2
Math Team
 
Joined: Jan 2015
From: Alabama

Posts: 2,210
Thanks: 555

What do you mean by "read the graph"- what do you want to learn from the graph?

And why was this posted under "differential equations"?
Country Boy is offline  
November 22nd, 2016, 08:44 PM   #3
Global Moderator
 
Joined: Dec 2006

Posts: 16,191
Thanks: 1147

Presumably, "read the graph" means that the values of the four constants in the given equation are to be estimated by inspection of the graph.

For example, the equation implies f(0) = B. As the graph shows that f(0) = 1, one can conclude that B = 1.

I would suggest that $\beta= 6\pi$.
skipjack is offline  
November 23rd, 2016, 04:06 AM   #4
Newbie
 
Joined: Nov 2016
From: Finland

Posts: 2
Thanks: 0

Quote:
Originally Posted by Country Boy View Post
What do you mean by "read the graph"- what do you want to learn from the graph?

And why was this posted under "differential equations"?
By reading the graph i meant to find α,β,A,B, for y(x)=e^(αx)(Asin(βx)+Bcos(βx)).

And that equation is differential equations of second order with 2 complex roots.

Last edited by animez; November 23rd, 2016 at 04:11 AM.
animez is offline  
November 23rd, 2016, 05:52 AM   #5
Global Moderator
 
Joined: Dec 2006

Posts: 16,191
Thanks: 1147

If you accept my suggestions that B = 1 and $\beta$ = 6$\pi$, I would further suggest that A = tan(2$\pi$/5). These values of A and $\beta$ are based on assumptions about the exact values of $x$ where the graph's turning points occur. Unfortunately, one can't be so precise in giving the value of $\alpha$, because the graph depicts the function using a rather broad line.
skipjack is offline  
Reply

  My Math Forum > College Math Forum > Differential Equations

Tags
read, wave, wawe



Thread Tools
Display Modes


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
how do I read this? GIjoefan1976 Algebra 16 October 6th, 2016 02:09 PM
read in PARI Hoempa Computer Science 13 November 17th, 2012 02:07 PM
How would you read this Sasha Calculus 2 February 3rd, 2012 12:19 PM
You have to read this book forcesofodin Math Books 2 December 12th, 2010 08:00 AM
unable to read PM galactus Calculus 4 January 1st, 1970 12:00 AM





Copyright © 2017 My Math Forum. All rights reserved.