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February 27th, 2017, 02:36 PM   #1
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Can someone help me get started on this proof?

Let f be analytic and bounded by M in |z|≤ r. Prove that |f (n)(z)| ≤ n!M/〖(r-|z|)〗^n for (|z| < r).
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February 27th, 2017, 02:50 PM   #2
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I can't decipher your question.
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February 27th, 2017, 03:00 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FournierDaniel View Post
|f (n)(z)|
That expression does not look right. What is $n$? Do you by any chance mean $f^n(z)$? Or $f^{(n)}(z)$ meaning the $n$-th derivative?

Also in my opinion and speaking only for myself, questions at this level should certainly be $\LaTeX$'d. If you can hack complex variables you can certainly hack $\LaTeX$
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Last edited by Maschke; February 27th, 2017 at 03:03 PM.
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February 27th, 2017, 06:05 PM   #4
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ps - I hope I didn't frighten off the OP. It's ok if you don't use math markup. But what you wrote is not correct as given.
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