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January 9th, 2015, 08:50 PM   #1
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?>>43 (over) 20 Ca +0 (over)(-1)e?

?>>43 (over) 20 Ca +0 (over)(-1)e?
I got 43 (over) 19 k
Did I do this correctly?
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January 10th, 2015, 09:10 AM   #2
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Please try to use $\displaystyle \LaTeX$.
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January 10th, 2015, 09:21 AM   #3
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Online LaTeX Equation Editor - create, integrate and download
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January 10th, 2015, 06:08 PM   #4
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http://latex.codecogs.com/gif.latex?...7D%7B19%7Dk%3F

Its not letting me download the image!! I spent a good 45 minutes trying to get the image too! but here is the coding for it if you wouldnt mind putting it into the equation editor! ? \rightarrow \frac{43}{20}Ca +\frac{0}{-1}e
=\frac{43}{19}k?
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January 10th, 2015, 08:51 PM   #5
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you can download the image too.
but you are not supposed to download images to use them in this forum.

just copy the codes from edit screen to this comment box.

and put them in between [ MATH] [ /MATH] without space.

like [ MATH] \frac{1}{2} [ /MATH] = $\displaystyle \frac{1}{2}$
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January 11th, 2015, 11:59 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by girlbadatmath View Post
http://latex.codecogs.com/gif.latex?...7D%7B19%7Dk%3F

Its not letting me download the image!! I spent a good 45 minutes trying to get the image too! but here is the coding for it if you wouldnt mind putting it into the equation editor! ? \rightarrow \frac{43}{20}Ca +\frac{0}{-1}e
=\frac{43}{19}k?
Why would it allow you to download image ? You tried to embed it in the page (which professionals know better !). You keep typing your code and do nothing special. Once you're done typing, look at the preview, adjust the size, and then find the option to download the image. You can also download transparent and colourful images ! The main thing is to observe the website.
I would still suggest the math tags which come when you press the $ \displaystyle \Sigma$ button while posting. Simply type the code between those tags, i.e. , [ MATH ] your_$\LaTeX$_code [/MATH]. Or simply put your code between two $ symbols.
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Last edited by Prakhar; January 11th, 2015 at 12:04 PM.
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January 11th, 2015, 10:23 PM   #7
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if you click the link it will take you to the problem.
http://latex.codecogs.com/gif.latex?...7D%7B19%7Dk%3F
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January 11th, 2015, 10:23 PM   #8
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http://latex.codecogs.com/gif.latex?...7D%7B19%7Dk%3F
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January 12th, 2015, 08:06 AM   #9
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I had no issues ! Note one thing : That website has a habit of generating live preview of the image. So, either type the entire code manually, or, if you're copy-pasting the code into the website, just delete the last character and retype that same character.
This is your $\displaystyle \LaTeX$ code :
Code:
\rightarrow \frac{43}{20}Ca +\frac{0}{-1}e
=\frac{43}{19}k?
You have three options and the first two are the easiest :

1. Paste or type the $\displaystyle \LaTeX$ code around MATH tags like this :
Code:
$\displaystyle \rightarrow \frac{43}{20}Ca +\frac{0}{-1}e
=\frac{43}{19}k?
$
The output is this :
$\displaystyle \rightarrow \frac{43}{20}Ca +\frac{0}{-1}e
=\frac{43}{19}k? $
Math tags can be either typed manually or brought by pressing $\displaystyle \Sigma$ button when you're posting reply (not quick reply !).

2. Type or paste your $\displaystyle \LaTeX$ code between two $\displaystyle \$$ symbols like this :
Code:
$ \rightarrow \frac{43}{20}Ca +\frac{0}{-1}e
=\frac{43}{19}k? $
The output is this :
$ \rightarrow \frac{43}{20}Ca +\frac{0}{-1}e
=\frac{43}{19}k? $

3. Go to codecogs website and manually type the code. You can also copy-paste the code but then you need to delete the last character and retype it because the website has a habit of generating live preview. You'll get the option to download image in many formats.
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Last edited by Prakhar; January 12th, 2015 at 08:10 AM.
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January 12th, 2015, 08:35 AM   #10
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I think you are trying to write down a (correct) nuclear reaction for electron capture leading to beta decay:

$\displaystyle ^{40}_{20}Ca + ^0_{-1}e \rightarrow ^{40}_{19}K + \nu + \gamma$

You've basically got the correct answer. Don't worry about the neutrino ($\displaystyle \nu$) or the energy ($\displaystyle \gamma$) term if you've never seen them before. They are not really important from a chemistry standpoint and are specified just to be complete, since from a particle physics standpoint we need to conserve lepton number (hence the neutrino) and energy (hence the gamma thing). Just leave them out, so it looks like

$\displaystyle ^{40}_{20}Ca + ^0_{-1}e \rightarrow ^{40}_{19}K$

Also, Kudos for giving LateX a go! I understand that it's not easy for someone who's never seen it before. Below I've pasted the code to give the above reaction. The key thing is the ^ and _ operators, which just make the thing in the curly brackets superscript or subscript (i.e. top or bottom in tiny writing). To make it appear awesome, sandwich the LaTeX code between [MATH.] and [/MATH.] and take away the dots.

Also, the nuclear reactions do not have fraction lines, so you shouldn't use \frac{}{} in your LaTeX code.

Code:
^{40}_{20}Ca + ^0_{-1}e \rightarrow ^{40}_{19}K + \nu + \gamma
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