My Math Forum  

Go Back   My Math Forum > College Math Forum > Calculus

Calculus Calculus Math Forum


Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
November 23rd, 2017, 01:08 AM   #1
Member
 
Joined: Jan 2017
From: Huddersfield

Posts: 30
Thanks: 0

Pendulum theory

A pendulum is swinging at a rate of 1.00586 seconds, to correct to 1 second what would the change in length of the pendulum be?

Can this be worked out from the information given or is more info needed such as the weight of the pendulum?

Can anybody show me how to work this out please
Jimkeller1993 is offline  
 
November 23rd, 2017, 01:53 AM   #2
Senior Member
 
Joined: Feb 2016
From: Australia

Posts: 1,460
Thanks: 489

Math Focus: Yet to find out.
You can play around with it here: Pendulum
Joppy is offline  
November 23rd, 2017, 03:12 AM   #3
Senior Member
 
Joined: Apr 2014
From: Glasgow

Posts: 2,081
Thanks: 698

Math Focus: Physics, mathematical modelling, numerical and computational solutions
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jimkeller1993 View Post
A pendulum is swinging at a rate of 1.00586 seconds, to correct to 1 second what would the change in length of the pendulum be?

Can this be worked out from the information given or is more info needed such as the weight of the pendulum?

Can anybody show me how to work this out please
There is a key formula that allows you to answer this problem, which relates the physical parameters of a pendulum to its period:

$\displaystyle T = 2 \pi \sqrt{\frac{L}{g}}$

where:
T = Period of pendulum (s)
L = length of pendulum (m)
g = gravitational acceleration constant (take this to be 9.81 m/s$\displaystyle ^{2}$)

Note: this formula is great if the maximum angle of the swing is small. If it is large, then this formula can only be used as an approximation.

So... using this formula, you should be able to get its current length. Then you can derive the new length required to get the particular period you want. The change in length required is then just the difference between the two length results.
Benit13 is offline  
Reply

  My Math Forum > College Math Forum > Calculus

Tags
pendulum, theory



Thread Tools
Display Modes


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Two-sphere pendulum Loren Physics 8 June 15th, 2017 09:30 AM
Help with double pendulum using RK4 Rezalt Differential Equations 0 December 18th, 2014 03:26 AM
A pendulum experiment Chikis Physics 6 February 19th, 2013 01:12 PM
pendulum solution msteinma Applied Math 2 June 9th, 2012 10:57 AM
String pendulum jk22 Physics 0 July 7th, 2010 02:26 PM





Copyright © 2017 My Math Forum. All rights reserved.