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February 5th, 2013, 08:08 AM   #1
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Zeta on the critical line

Prove that zeta has no zeros (Riemann's) on the critical line (real part 1/2) with an integral imaginary part, that is, the imaginary part is an integer.

I am half-way through of proving it, would be appreciated if someone do it before me.
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February 5th, 2013, 01:20 PM   #2
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Re: Zeta on the critical line

If you do it and the proof is correct, you will become rich (prize is $1,000,000.) and famous.
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February 5th, 2013, 02:41 PM   #3
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Re: Zeta on the critical line

Mathman I am not sure why you say so. This statement is not the Riemann Hypothesis at all.
I like very much things like "I am half way through the derivation"..If you don't have yet the full derivation, how do you know you are half the way through it ??
Having said that, I don't have the time to work on this now, but I would be glad to see later how it is proven. Thanks!
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February 5th, 2013, 06:57 PM   #4
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Re: Zeta on the critical line

Quote:
Originally Posted by mathbalarka
Prove that zeta has no zeros (Riemann's) on the critical line (real part 1/2) with an integral imaginary part, that is, the imaginary part is an integer.

I am half-way through of proving it, would be appreciated if someone do it before me.
What ever you are doing . Good luck with it !
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February 5th, 2013, 10:47 PM   #5
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Re: Zeta on the critical line

Quote:
Originally Posted by mathman
If you do it and the proof is correct, you will become rich (prize is $1,000,000.) and famous.
This isn't RH and not even one of the Millennium Prize Problems

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dougy
If you don't have yet the full derivation, how do you know you are half the way through it ??
I am saying this because I think a part of my proof have to be correct but not sure about it since I am unable to prove it.
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February 6th, 2013, 06:34 AM   #6
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Re: Zeta on the critical line

Okay, a sketch of my line of proof :

If has no zeros at for positive integer n, then to prove it, we need a sum with denominator . After one or two research, I found this one :



I am almost sure that this sum converges but not able to prove it. I've also checked with PARI and it returned :



But I do not trust computerized results and want to prove it by hands, anyone interested?
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February 6th, 2013, 12:13 PM   #7
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Re: Zeta on the critical line

Hi Balarka,

That 's probably going to be tough to find an analytical value for this sum! Also constitutionally, I think that does not mean anything. I don't know what is PARI but it has to calculate until a certain N, right?, So what it proves is that there is no root of this form for n<N, but you can never check until infinity like this. The sum can converge (because the derivative of zeta will tend to zero enough fast) until one of the terms blows up if there is a zero of that form. Do you agree?
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February 6th, 2013, 09:32 PM   #8
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Re: Zeta on the critical line

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dougy
The sum can converge (because the derivative of zeta will tend to zero enough fast) until one of the terms blows up if there is a zero of that form. Do you agree?
Yes, you are right I wasn't thinking straight.

So, what about it? Can this be proved that zeta has no nontrivial zeros with imaginary part an integer or is it a conjecture ? atleast I never heard of it.

EDIT:
Can we use to bound up the sum?
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February 6th, 2013, 10:05 PM   #9
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Re: Zeta on the critical line

Hi,

That's funny I wanted to write "computationally" and the spell-check change me this to "constitutionally"!!
Anyway, I don't know about it. Do you have a reason in the first place for assuming there can not be zeros of that form? I personally don't have an argument for that.
I think the last formula you wrote will not help you. My guess is that it is Balarka's conjecture!
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February 6th, 2013, 10:39 PM   #10
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Re: Zeta on the critical line

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dougy
Do you have a reason in the first place for assuming there can not be zeros of that form?
I assumed it just by looking at the first few zeros of zeta : http://www.dtc.umn.edu/~odlyzko/zeta_tables/zeros1

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dougy
My guess is that it is Balarka's conjecture!
Well that's my specialty! I conjecture weird things but can't prove any of them
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