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April 9th, 2014, 12:43 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by soroban View Post
Speaking of West Side Story, consider four
consecutive triplets. Recite this phrase:
DA-da-da, DA-da-da, DA-da-da, DA-da-da.

Now in the last two triplets, accent every other note:
DA-da-da, DA-da-da, DA-da-DA-da-DA-da.
I believe Stravinsky did something similar in The Rite of Spring.

And Bruckner was very fond of this rhythmic motif: DA-da DA-da-da DA-da DA-da-da … (the accented DA’s being equally spaced in time). Listen to it, for example, in the opening of the Fourth Symphony.
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April 12th, 2014, 07:01 PM   #12
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More unusual rhythms



The first movement of Gustaf Holtz's Hymn of Jesus is in 5/4.
It was my first experience with unusual rhythms.
It went: $\displaystyle \;|\,\blacksquare\!\blacksquare\,\blacksquare\! \blacksquare\,\blacksquare\,|\, \blacksquare\!\blacksquare\,\blacksquare\! \blacksquare\,\blacksquare\,| $

That was years before Dave Brubeck's Take Five:
$\displaystyle \qquad \blacksquare\, \blacksquare\!\blacksquare\,\blacksquare\, \blacksquare\!\blacksquare\,\blacksquare\! \blacksquare\,\blacksquare\!\blacksquare $

And the Mission Impossible theme.
$\displaystyle \qquad\blacksquare\,\square\,\square\,\blacksquare \!\blacksquare\,\square\,\blacksquare\! \blacksquare\,\blacksquare\!\blacksquare $


Brubeck has this in Blue Rondo ala Turk (9/8):
$\displaystyle \quad$ DA-da, DA-da, DA-da, DA-da-da

He also had Unsquare Dance in 7/4.
$\displaystyle \qquad \blacksquare\,\times\,\blacksquare\,\times\, \blacksquare \,\times\,\times $
where the $\displaystyle \times$'s were handclaps.


I believe The Terminator theme is in 7/4.

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April 13th, 2014, 02:55 AM   #13
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One of the best known examples of 5/4 time in classical music is the second movement of Tchaikovsky’s Sixth Symphony, the Pathétique.
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April 16th, 2014, 04:02 PM   #14
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Did you know that the opening passage of Stravinsky's
Rite of Spring is not played by an oboe?

It is a bassoon playing above its normal range.

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April 21st, 2014, 07:27 PM   #15
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You mentioned the whole-tone scale: $\displaystyle \; C\:D\:E\:F\sharp\:G\sharp \:A\sharp\:\text{ or }\:D\flat\:E\flat \:F\:G\;A\;B$

I "discovered" it prior to my Music theory courses.
I was noodling on a piano at school and ran across it.
I found it to be the creepiest set of notes. $\displaystyle \;$Anything
I played sounded like the soundtrack from a horror movie.

Later my music theory teacher mentioned that the theme from
the old radio show "The Whistler" was written in a whole-tone scale.
He even whistled the theme for us, something I never mastered.

He taught us how to do quarter-note triplets. $\displaystyle \;$He said walk slowly,
counting ONE-two-three, FOUR-five six with each step. $\displaystyle \;$Once you
get that rhythm going, snap your fingers on One, Three, and Five.
It is a bit unsettling, but with a little practice, you'll get it.
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April 22nd, 2014, 04:43 AM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by soroban View Post
He taught us how to do quarter-note triplets. $\displaystyle \;$He said walk slowly,
counting ONE-two-three, FOUR-five six with each step. $\displaystyle \;$Once you
get that rhythm going, snap your fingers on One, Three, and Five.
It is a bit unsettling, but with a little practice, you'll get it.
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I know that. Apparently Dvořák was very fond of this switching – have a listen, for example, to the powerful scherzo of his Sixth Symphony. In the scherzo of his Seventh Symphony he does even better: the music is written in fast 6/4 time with the rhythm divided between two sets of three crotchets to the bar and three sets of two crotchets to the bar.

I believe the technical name for this is hemiola.
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April 24th, 2014, 03:21 PM   #17
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$\displaystyle CE\flat G$ and $\displaystyle BDF\sharp$ walk into a bar.

The bartender says, "We don't serve minors here."

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