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March 24th, 2013, 09:51 AM   #1
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Primitive Statements

I think I have statements down, but am a little confused about primitive statements. Here is the problem:

Determine whether each of the following sentences is a statement:

a) In 2003 George W. Bush was the president of the United States.
b) x+3 is a positive integer.
c) Fifteen is an even number.
d) If Jennifer is late for the party, then her cousin Zachary will be quite angry.
e) What time is it?
f) As of June 30, 2003, Christine Marie Evert had won the French Open a record seven times.

From what I can gather, (a), (c), and (f) are statements because they are either true or false. Is this correct?

Here is the second part of the question. Identify the primitive statements of (a) through (f). Primitive statements cannot be broken down into anything simpler.

So, only (c) is a primitive statement, correct?
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March 24th, 2013, 09:52 AM   #2
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Re: Primitive Statements

Or would you break down the statements into primitive statements too? Such as:

(a) In 2003, George W Bush was the President of the United States.

Would you say that:

"George W Bush was the President" as a primitive statement?
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March 24th, 2013, 11:10 AM   #3
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Re: Primitive Statements

I would say that all but e are statements.

I think the second part of the question is not to identify which of these are primitive but rather to break each down into primitive statements. So the compound statement in d can be broken down into If (Jennifer is late for the party), then ([Jennifer's] cousin Zachary will be quite angry).
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March 24th, 2013, 11:23 AM   #4
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Re: Primitive Statements

Thank you for your quick reply. I actually see that (b) would be either true or false, but is (d)?

Because how can you determine that it is either true or false, but not both? Wouldn't it depend on the person you are asking? Which would make it undetermined?
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March 24th, 2013, 12:20 PM   #5
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Re: Primitive Statements

Quote:
Originally Posted by rhymin
Thank you for your quick reply. I actually see that (b) would be either true or false, but is (d)?

Because how can you determine that it is either true or false, but not both? Wouldn't it depend on the person you are asking? Which would make it undetermined?
I'm supposing they have a particular person (and party) in mind. You could then find the truth value of the two parts and decide the truth or falsity of the implication.
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