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December 6th, 2012, 07:43 AM   #1
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mathematically related essay topic

Ok so i have an essay question regarding some philosophically implied area, and it says "patterns formed generally or general patterns gives us the knowledge whereas looking at particular and specific examples gives us the understanding. How far can we say that this statement holds true?"

i was thinking in terms of inductive and deductive reasoning, but i need some ideas, could anyone give me some ideas on this topic??

thank you
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January 16th, 2013, 07:00 PM   #2
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Re: mathematically related essay topic

ANYONE???
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January 16th, 2013, 08:34 PM   #3
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Re: mathematically related essay topic

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Originally Posted by gaussrelatz
Ok so i have an essay question regarding some philosophically implied area, and it says "patterns formed generally or general patterns gives us the knowledge whereas looking at particular and specific examples gives us the understanding. How far can we say that this statement holds true?"

i was thinking in terms of inductive and deductive reasoning, but i need some ideas, could anyone give me some ideas on this topic??

thank you
it depends on your definition of knowledge and understanding. I would say you've got them reversed. Looking at specifics gives us knowledge. Looking at the general pattern gives understanding. In other words understanding is more general and deeper than mere knowledge, which just consists of lists of particulars.

That's how I understand those terms. But clearly you understand them differently, since you've got them reversed. So you need to be clear about your definitions.

There's no right or wrong to a fuzzy question like that. You might look into the idea that there are two kinds of mathematicians: problem solvers, and theory builders. Here it is ... it's by Tim Gowers, a Fields medalist and a terrific blogger and popularizer too.

https://www.dpmms.cam.ac.uk/~wtg10/2cultures.pdf

As far as the quantity of replies, this is a low-traffic forum. You can wait days sometimes between posts. You might try asking your question on the Philosophy Forum ...

http://forums.philosophyforums.com/

They have a section on the philosophy of math.
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January 16th, 2013, 10:27 PM   #4
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Re: mathematically related essay topic

Actually this site averages almost 64 posts per day.
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September 26th, 2013, 04:37 AM   #5
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Re: mathematically related essay topic

Hi,
I would always go with the Mobius loop. Its a loop of paper with a twist in it. When you cut it in half you just get one big loop. If it had two twists in it you get two interlinked loops. If you wikipedia this you can research this phenomenom and explain it in your essay. And the essay on stress management also is a good topic.
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