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August 25th, 2008, 02:49 AM   #1
nur
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i need your help

Hi all!
I am not from an English native speaking country and I need your help, since i cannot be find it in dictionaries. Please, tell me how do you read numbers that are more complicated, for example:

3x(10^-1.
Thank you for your time.
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August 25th, 2008, 03:54 AM   #2
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Re: i need your help

"Three times ten to the [power of] minus eighteen." You can exclude saying the part in square brackets.

The "minus eighteen" is the "exponent" of the "base number" ten. The entire quantity [not including the 3] is a "power of ten".

In a^b, you have Base = a, Exponent = b, and the entire quantity is a "power of a".

Powers of ten are 10^3, 10^12, 10^0, 10^(-1, ....
Negative exponents define inverses, so 10^(-1 = 1/(10^1, and so on.
10^0 = 1. ["Ten to the zero" is identically 1, as is any power with exponent zero.]
Fractional exponents define roots: 10^(1/2) = the square root of ten.
10^(2/3) = "The cube root of ten, squared." Or, identically, "The cube root of 'ten squared' ."
That is, [10^(1/3)]2 is mathematically the same as [10^2]^(1/3).

Your best bet is to find an older textbook in English and read through it.
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August 25th, 2008, 04:06 AM   #3
nur
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Re: i need your help

Thank you very much, Dave.
In my contry, we study English but not terms in maths. Till now, I haven't thought of how to read such numbers, since I have had just to write them. There's an oral presentation
I have to make, so I appreciate your help.
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