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October 21st, 2017, 01:24 PM   #1
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E=mc2

Is E=mc2 considered a "cubic" equation?

What is the term to describe "multi-ordered" equations? Meaning...more than two degrees in order? Polynomials?
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October 21st, 2017, 04:43 PM   #2
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No, it's linear in mass and energy. The speed of light is usually considered to be constant.

An expression of the form $(a_nx^n + a_{n-1}x^{n-1} + \ldots + a_2x^2 + a_1x + a_0)$ is a polynomial (in a single variable).

A more general expression with a finite number of terms of the form $ a x_1^{p_1} x_2^{p_2} \ldots x_n^{p_n}$ is a polynomial in $n$ variables.
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October 21st, 2017, 05:02 PM   #3
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Go read-up:
E=mc^2 - An Explanation of the Basics and Units
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October 22nd, 2017, 06:24 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by v8archie View Post
No, it's linear in mass and energy. The speed of light is usually considered to be constant.

An expression of the form $(a_nx^n + a_{n-1}x^{n-1} + \ldots + a_2x^2 + a_1x + a_0)$ is a polynomial (in a single variable).

A more general expression with a finite number of terms of the form $ a x_1^{p_1} x_2^{p_2} \ldots x_n^{p_n}$ is a polynomial in $n$ variables.
Thank you. Do you know where I can read up on the 'c2' ? It's peculiar.
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October 23rd, 2017, 10:06 AM   #5
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What you are writing as "c2" would better be written as "c^2" or, even better, "$\displaystyle c^2$". It is "c times c" or "c squared" and c is the speed of light.
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Last edited by skipjack; October 23rd, 2017 at 04:13 PM.
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October 23rd, 2017, 12:07 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nietzscheswoman View Post
Thank you. Do you know where I can read up on the 'c2' ? It's peculiar.
Try here they have good sound simple explanations.

Relativistic Energy

It also explains that the famous formula so often quoted is incomplete as


$\displaystyle E = m{c^2}$

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October 24th, 2017, 02:48 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nietzscheswoman View Post
Is E=mc2 considered a "cubic" equation?

What is the term to describe "multi-ordered" equations? Meaning...more than two degrees in order? Polynomials?
For the record, the full equation for the energy, mass and momentum of a particle is

$\displaystyle E^2 = m^2c^4 + p^2 c^2$

where E is kinetic energy (J), m is mass (kg), c is 299792458 m/s and p is momentum (kg m/s). The case when $\displaystyle p = 0$ gives Einstein's famous equation.
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