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February 19th, 2012, 01:29 PM   #1
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proving -0=0

How do we prove : -0 = 0 ??
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February 19th, 2012, 01:47 PM   #2
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Re: proving -0=0

Hi;
as far as I know all equations need to be kept in balance ie what we do
on one side must be done on the other.

So -0=0 and 0=-0 we add 0 to one side we must subtract it from the other to keep the balance.
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February 19th, 2012, 01:53 PM   #3
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Re: proving -0=0

or if you prefer.

-0=0 subtract from both sides gives --0=-0 = +0 =-0 = 0 =-0

Hope this helps.
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February 19th, 2012, 02:02 PM   #4
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Re: proving -0=0

Quote:
Originally Posted by anthonye
or if you prefer.

-0=0 subtract from both sides gives --0=-0 = +0 =-0 = 0 =-0

Hope this helps.
I cannot follow.

Can you be more clear??

How do you start the proof?
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February 19th, 2012, 02:08 PM   #5
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Re: proving -0=0

Subtracting a negative number is like adding the same corresponding number

minus a negative number is the same as adding the same corresponding number

--0=-0.

does that help.
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February 19th, 2012, 02:59 PM   #6
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Re: proving -0=0

The set of real numbers to the right of 0 is called positive numbers; the set to left of 0 is the set of negative numbers while 0 itself neither positive nor negative
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February 19th, 2012, 08:12 PM   #7
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Re: proving -0=0

Quote:
Originally Posted by azizlwl
The set of real numbers to the right of 0 is called positive numbers; the set to left of 0 is the set of negative numbers while 0 itself neither positive nor negative
You mean by definition is : -0 =0 ??
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February 19th, 2012, 08:24 PM   #8
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Re: proving -0=0

Zero in the only real number without a sign, implied or otherwise. Zero is neither negative nor positive. Positive is defined as greater than zero and negative is defined as less than zero. However, if we try to find a number x whose negative is equal to its positive, we find:







So, we find, among the real numbers at least, that zero is the only number such that -x = x.
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February 19th, 2012, 08:36 PM   #9
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Re: proving -0=0

Quote:
Originally Posted by MarkFL
Zero in the only real number without a sign, implied or otherwise. Zero is neither negative nor positive. Positive is defined as greater than zero and negative is defined as less than zero. However, if we try to find a number x whose negative is equal to its positive, we find:







So, we find, among the real numbers at least, that zero is the only number such that -x = x.
I think you have just prove that :

If -x =x then x=0 .

But we want ,-0 =0 ,only
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February 19th, 2012, 08:38 PM   #10
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Re: proving -0=0

Showing that if -x = x then x = 0, shows that -0 = 0, does it not?
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