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June 2nd, 2011, 08:17 PM   #1
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*solved it please remove

Can someone please tell me how to find the cross product between two seven dimensional vectors?

For instance, if the first vector is <a,b,c,d,e,f,g> and the second vector is <h,i,j,k,l,m,n>, what would the new vector, that we'll call <o,p,q,r,s,t,u>, be if it's the cross product of the first two? I'm not a math major and can't really understand advanced math terms or explanations. I literally need someone to tell me that o =, p =, q =, etc. I've been looking at the wikipedia page (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seven-dime ... ss_product)for a while, but it's just too esoteric for me to understand.

Ugh never mind, figured it out. For anyone who cares, if you go to the wiki link, it's under coordinate expressions - the part where it says

X x Y = (x2y4 - x4y2 .......

Each row is the new value of the new vector. I have absolutely no idea why they are adding each row together.

Why is it I struggle with these things until five minutes after asking other people...
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June 3rd, 2011, 02:21 AM   #2
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Let's leave the above, as others may be interested. The rows are used to form products that are added, as is usual for matrix multiplication.
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