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Academic Guidance Academic Guidance - Academic guidance for those pursuing a college degree... what college? Grad school? PhD help?


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June 6th, 2016, 07:51 AM   #1
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What's better - college or university?

Hello,
what's better... college or university?

Last edited by skipjack; June 6th, 2016 at 07:56 PM.
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June 6th, 2016, 07:56 AM   #2
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A university is usually better, but there are a number of sub-par universities in places like Britain and the Philippines that are pretty easy to get into, so those would be worse than 'college'. Note that universities are often colloquially called colleges, or colleges can be parts of universities (e.g. Cambridge).
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June 6th, 2016, 12:39 PM   #3
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There is no "best" institution. Only a best institution for a particular student. You should seek an institution that offers the right course for you, with the right components for you, in the right order for you. You should seek one that teaches in a style that is suitable for you and at a pace that is suitable for you. You should seek an institution that has the same end in mind for its students as you do for yourself.

Some of the above you may not know (such as the best ordering of course components for you). In that case, you should assume that you are "normal" in this regard and check that the course is taught in a "normal" order.

Teaching style is probably the most critical thing on this list. Is the course primarily lecture-based, classroom based, tutorial-based, self-study-based or (likely) a combination of the above. What combination will work for you? If you are the sort of person that would rather spend the afternoon playing video games, or in the bar, then a system that expects you to study for yourself in the afternoons isn't going to work for you - unless you can be very disciplined.

In terms of ends, is the institution geared to producing researchers or people who are ready for working in industry? Do they intend that you know a lot about the subject or that you can deduce more for yourself or both?

Places like Harvard, Stamford, Oxford and Cambridge are usually called "the best" but that doesn't mean they are the best in every subject (York university is a world leader in History, for example, and Hatfield Polytechnic - as it used to be called -in aeronautical engineering). If "the best" means the intelligence or "quality" of students they put out, perhaps Havard and Cambridge are the best, but then, they take the most intelligent in too. If you aren't one of the most intelligent, you'd probably struggle to complete the course.
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June 6th, 2016, 08:16 PM   #4
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In the US, colleges do not, and universities do, grant post-graduate degrees. The quality and prestige of a bachelor's degree is entirely unrelated to whether the institution granting it is a university or not. It is true that many of the best colleges in the US are part of a university, but there are excellent colleges that are not part of a university. Moreover, there are many universities in the US that are far from excellent academically.

I like Archie's answer. In the US at least, find the institution that has the best instructors in what you are interested in studying. Whether the name is university or college is immaterial. Furthermore, in the US, many colleges are part of a university that may or may not have more than one college. I got my bachelor's degree from Columbia College, which is part of Columbia University, and my wife got hers from Barnard College, which is also part of Columbia University.
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June 7th, 2016, 12:27 AM   #5
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I have completed my degree in college where there was no practical all were ready made kits old one ....
and they have not given good marks too some teacher also make fun while teaching all were shop business on rent
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June 7th, 2016, 12:29 AM   #6
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some of teacher never seen industry all theory of no understanding and time was spend they learn was zero in practicals .
some good college i found in India where i cant join lack of seats
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September 6th, 2016, 04:47 AM   #7
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Post secondary education is so much more than working towards getting a job. It is a time to develop as an adult, both academically and personally.

University is not for everyone but what university does is teach people how to think. Colleges teach people how to do. It may not seem like a big difference but it is. Unless you are in specific trades a college diploma may lead you to a job in that field but quite frankly, in my experience, many with just that diploma end up somewhat pigeon holed as they lack the skills to think in a very broad manner. I see it in my workplace. Virtually all middle and upper Management have University degrees and have worked their way up through the system.

We need to ensure people are big thinkers, and have the ability to see broad picture. Now not everyone is capable of that, and not everyone is capable of being a big broad thinker and it is folly to encourage someone to go to a university if that is not in their list of strengths.

Of my four, one had no interest in post secondary, one knew she was more suited to a college type program and the other two were more than capable to manage University. They knew there capabilities and their goals.
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September 6th, 2016, 05:07 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KatyHaynes View Post
what university does is teach people how to think. Colleges teach people how to do.
I agree with much of what you say, but this is a huge generalisation. It depends very much on which university and even which course you do.
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September 6th, 2016, 11:17 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KatyHaynes View Post
University is not for everyone but what university does is teach people how to think. Colleges teach people how to do.
I think it would be great if this distinction was consistent everywhere. But as v8archie has said, it's too broad a generalization. I am a student at a 'University', but the focus of this University is quite practical. The overall theme seems to be to equip students with a practical approach to better equip them for the workplace.

That being said... There is enough academic focus to produce 'big thinkers'.
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